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Thread: Clipping nails problem

  1. #1
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    Clipping nails problem

    Our dogs nails are getting long & she would not let groomer cut them so we took her to the vet who had to sedate her to cut her nails as she will not have them cut. The vet only took off a small amount as they said she fought the sedation & was aggressive to them so they will not do her nails again so how can we get them trimmed as they are still long. We walk her on hard ground but the problem is her nails grow quickly.

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  3. #2
    Senior Member Jane's Avatar
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    I don't have any good advice, hope you find some expert to ask about this.
    Stay Cool

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    My Schatzi pretty much hates having her nails done, found out partially she hates being restrained on the grooming table. I found a groomer that allows me to give her treats while she is clipping her nails. She still does not love it, but we are able to make it work and are getting there. The other thing I do is file her nails in between visits (using a high grit nail file from the beauty supply store). Some people have taught their dogs to use scratch boards. That is my next challenge.

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  6. #4
    Senior Member GunaLV's Avatar
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    sedate the dog just to cut nails? man, you guys are going a bit far with these things.
    First of all - if the nails are too long - what does your dog do? Sits on the couch all day long? Activities will help, trust me. And by activities I don't mean walking a around the block.
    Second - now there are other ways (and not sedating, what a terrible idea!) how to cut your dogs nails. One of them is to cut after a walk when dog has spent a lot of time in the water. Nails get soft and very easy to cut. Or you can buy nail filer for dogs. There are mechanic ones and would take couple of minutes of your time and this thing is less stressful for the dog.
    And the last thing - if you can't clip your dogs nails just because it doesn't like it, you have a problem.
    *The dog is the only animal that has seen it's god.*

  7. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by GunaLV View Post
    sedate the dog just to cut nails? man, you guys are going a bit far with these things.
    First of all - if the nails are too long - what does your dog do? Sits on the couch all day long? Activities will help, trust me. And by activities I don't mean walking a around the block.
    Second - now there are other ways (and not sedating, what a terrible idea!) how to cut your dogs nails. One of them is to cut after a walk when dog has spent a lot of time in the water. Nails get soft and very easy to cut. Or you can buy nail filer for dogs. There are mechanic ones and would take couple of minutes of your time and this thing is less stressful for the dog.
    And the last thing - if you can't clip your dogs nails just because it doesn't like it, you have a problem.
    No need to be aggressive I was only asking for advice.

    The vet suggested sedation as the dog does not like here feet touched maybe from abuse by previous owners as she is a rescue dog & has arthritis in her front legs so on the advise of the vet she only gets short walks. We have tried nail files also pedicure sanders but as soon as you touch here nails she is aggressive.
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    Well, I read your post about the nails and it was a conundrum for me... and I didn't respond because the only suggestions I have might sound lame... (I will make it below for what it's worth anyway) and as I only rescue Rotties, I too have had several dogs with their own head trips created by crappy owners. And there are other mitigating factors in someof the care. Some years ago my Snacks had very brittle nails and he was always breaking them at the quick, and one time when he had one that was half way broken off and was very painful...and I wanted to fix it but he wouldn't let me handle it, I took him to the vet and they wanted $500.00 to sedate him to fix it... $500.00 and this was something like 7 or 8 years ago. I'm not made of money, but I live in California where everything is incredibly expensive. I couldn't afford it, it wasn't life threatening (I would have made room for the expense on that condition, but $500 for a broken nail is really a vet trying to take advantage of a bad situation in my book...) and the nail eventually broke off a day or so later... But my Snacks was difficult to work with too and I definitely know what you are going through. In his former life before me Snacks was beaten so badly he associated doorways with beatings and would run through every doorway like the devil was after him and never trusted men, he would only let my husband scratch his butt if he was facing away from him at the time. He was a lot to handle on many levels. So he always wore a muzzle at the vet's office (for my peace of mind as well as the vet's). At his heart he was a very sweet loving dog who just wanted to be left alone by men and just be happy.

    Maybe if your Rottie likes certain treats a lot you can work on the nails while she is preoccupied with getting the treats.... have two people work on her. One holds the treats and pets her while the only one sneakily works on the paws. Maybe some positive reinforcement with treats in exchange for touching the paws and work your way up to clipping. Maybe sedate her a little with 3 or 4 Benadryls beforehand... they slow mine down (Fiona has been susceptible to hot spots and Benadryl helps and makes her tired)... and perhaps a muzzle on her too... I know, this stuff is not going to be a quick fix, but it was all I could think of. Good luck!

  9. #7
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    My 9 month old foster/rescue didn't even want his feet touched! He was a large, untrained, bully who wanted to grumble his dissatisfaction.

    So... I decided to touch his feet! I did it several times throughout the day, and praised every nanosecond. "What a brave boy! Good job letting me hold your paw!" Pop a treat. Let go. (repeat) It took me months of playing with his feet before I was brave enough to Dremel. I was afraid of nipping the quick if the dog moved, so I'd trained my girls to the Dremel since early puppyhood.

    At some point, I had the Dremel (turned on) on the table beside me while I played with his paw. "Wonderful! That's a Dremel. Isn't it funny? You and Dremel are going to be good friends" Once I felt he was ready, I touched the Dremel to a nail and finished it. "YAY! You did it!! Spectacular!" I'd planned on treating each nail. But he was so good he let me do the paw. Popped the treat and went on to the next.

    It takes time and your dog needs to know you are determined and consistent. The dog is praised for any compliance and neither forced nor babied. You want the dog to "give" the behavior. It takes patience and perseverence. It was 3 months of paw holding and Dremels on the table. Work on it! See if you can get it done with her cooperation.

    There's nothing wrong with a bit of benadryl or a muzzle if you have to resort to it. When I began with Stetson, I knew there was a chance it might end up that way. It didn't! He learned that touching his feet wasn't then end of the world and Dremels were not evil. He learned I never hurt him and that I praised and rewarded what he could give me that was right. He was very brave and he's better than one of my girls who is reluctantly compliant. He sees the Dremel and he volunteers to go first!

    Good luck with your dog. Hope you get her there.

    PS: Stetson was a keeper. He joined my girls and he loves us all.
    Last edited by Sabellesmom; 08-11-2016 at 03:00 AM.
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    Thanks steph & sabellesmom for your input but we have already tried what you suggest over a long period. She will gladly let you hold her paw & touch her nails with your fingers but when we touch her nails with anything else she pulls away & growls.

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    Senior Member GunaLV's Avatar
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    Sorry, didn't mean to come off so harsh but I am very surprised how vets in US can suggest sedating so easily, like it doesn't do any damage to dogs health. I also have had a rescue dog, we lived years fighting, he bit almost everyone in the family but with a hard work we managed to change him.
    If your dog has arthritis it still has to walk, so walk where these is water (and swimming helps) and clip the nails just after the walk while nails are still soft. It will be two person job but it's worth it. As soft nails doesn't make that horrible 'click' sound, the dog takes it easier,it's also easier for the one who clips them. And you still have to work on this with your dog, it's not that hard, it takes some time and benefits both of you.
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    *The dog is the only animal that has seen it's god.*

  12. #10
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    We are in the UK not USA & the vet sedated her as a last resort. We have overcome many problems we inherited with the our dog behaviour wise but this one we just can't get it sorted. We & the vet think she has had a bad experience in the past from previous owner or a groomer doing her nails.
    We want the best for her & have spent over 1500gbp in the year we have had her on various illnesses she had when we got her to get her in the best possible health but the nail clipping is the one problem we can't solve.
    Sheera'smom likes this.

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