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Thread: First time Rottweiler owner. I apologise for the length.

  1. #1
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    First time Rottweiler owner. I apologise for the length.

    Hi Guys,
    Im new to owning a Rottweiler and to this forum. Other forums I have been on seeking help have not been helpful but very condescending. Let me explain my situation. Firstly Im over in Ireland, in a rural village with yes, narrow minded people when it comes to big breeds. I got my pup, called Nacho in mid March before the whole country went into lockdown. He was over 8wks old and settled in well. He bonded well with my German Shepherd Sudden very well, considering my GSD was dog aggressive. I posted on one forum asking for help as it was 9yrs since I had a puppy in my life and Sudden was a dream dog in all honesty, but I got criticised when the techniques they suggested dint work and I went back asking for other advice. Im not going into it but Ive not been back since May.
    Things were tough as I couldn't socialise him due to the lockdown and then the injections were due so it was mostly walks down our property for a good while. People were criticising me for getting him and how he would be an aggressive dog and how I was wrong to have got him. People I thought were my friends and people who have had no dogs in their life ever also! The 2 oldest children lost interest in him pretty quick as pups are bitey, quick little things! Things went from bad to worse when my beloved Sudden collapsed on me one night suddenly a week short of his birthday and had to be put to sleep. I was inconsolable to say the least and I found it so hard to bond with the puppy. Sudden was my life and best friend and so amazing with the kids it was difficult. Im in tears writing this cos I miss him so much everyday. We found ourselves comparing Nacho to Sudden which wasn't fair on him at all but it was all I knew. Eventually the lockdown was eased back after 3 1/2 months and I started meeting up with my cousin who has 2 border collies and things improved slightly. Nacho loves meeting dogs and has a great time playing with these two.
    However the kids have zero interest in him and don't play or spend time with him no matter how many times you give out to them. They used take him for a walk down our property on his lead and come back and tell you he was a rotter and was jumping or biting the lead so Ive given up asking them to do it. Things have improved between myself and Nacho after a tough, rough few months and he's gotten into football too which is great for him to wear him out. He's now 8mths old and seems to be bonding with the 4yr old who is with me most on walks and is authoritative with the pup..
    Sudden was strictly my dog who I trained and looked after for 9yrs and who would not go on walks with other people just me and I think Nacho is going down this road too as he won't head off with my oldest children or anyone. I'll get given out to for this at a later stage as I did with Sudden. Any suggestions or even any tips on anything to do with Rottweiler pups is welcome. I apologise for the long intro but it has made me feel better to write this down and hopefully not be judged..

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  3. #2
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    Welcome to the forums! I'm so sorry to hear about your dog Sudden. I know that losing a dog can be so heartbreaking.

    It's too bad that you did not get to socialize Nacho...but what is done is done. I would see if you can get a trainer to your home for some one-on-one lessons...just to get your family back on track with how to handle him with your children. Then get him into some obedience classes for the next year or two...and start working on bonding. The more time you spend training, the more you will bond..same with the kids.

    I would never count on kids to be interesting in a dog, or even caring for your dog. You wanted the dog, so it's up to your to care for the dog. If they want to help out that's fine...but don't count on them. Kids are kids...they have things to do.
    Steph King likes this.
    Eirian's Fancy Gem CGN TT HIC (April 2009-August 2020) "Jemma"

  4. #3
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    True about the kids. Would you mind if I ran a problem past you? I do have a trainer lined up for next week, earliest I could get and Id love some classes for him or agility but I don't know of any where I live and this whole virus has shut down so many places.
    Any how the question if I may.... I was out walking Nacho with my 4yr nephew down a bog road where there are no people or cars and he can be free to go mad in the long grass and puddles(he's getting braver with water). He was fine just running and jumping and panting away and then when we sat on tufts of grass he launched himself at me and took me by surprise so I let out a yelp and then he went mad jumping all over and jumped on my nephew who he is bigger than and scratched him. I scolded in a stern voice and turned. my back on him but he kept doing it until he just ran off. Ive had a great 2wks with him not jumping on the kids or being a jerk and then this today. Just randomly jumps and gets annoyed when you scold him and continues to do so. Any suggestions? I ignored him completely until he calmed down and then came over all nicey nice....

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  6. #4
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    How old is your pup now? Sounds like he may be at the teenage phase and stage. He most probably got overstimulated, and just too full of himself.
    Does he know his "sit" command? When they get overstimulated the best thing to do is a "sit" command with a treat pulled out of your pocket, and put the leash right back on him. End of freedom and fun. The problem with turning your back on them is that these big pups can still jump up, and scratch and do harm to you.

    Use a strong voice command..."SIT", show treat..praise..leash up, and quietly return home. If he starts jumping up while on leash, or trying to bite the leash..step on the leash..so it is shortened and he cannot jump up. He has to learn that fun ends, when he starts getting rough. Always try to stop an action that you don't want with a command that he knows already.

    Hopefully you will get some hands on help with a trainer. Rottweilers can be a handful for the first couple of years...if you put in the work with training and keep up with training....they are a wonderful breed.
    Steph King likes this.
    Eirian's Fancy Gem CGN TT HIC (April 2009-August 2020) "Jemma"

  7. #5
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    Welcome to the forum. Rotties can be wonderful dogs (we have had ten of them over the years, mostly adopted). They can be total handfuls too. Lot of work to get through to them sometimes, but give it time. Your Nacho will become closer and obey beautifully eventually. BBD is our resident expert on pups.

    Since I haven't had pups since our first two over 30 years ago I'm not as experienced with them and can't say much about that. When I got my first girl Rottie I kept her with me all the time and took her everywhere and she was always obedient and amazingly responsive. She chewed everything she could get her mouth on is mostly what I remember, but when it came to being a good girl, it seemed it's what she lived for. She was the best of the best.

    Rotties are rough and tumble dogs and I don't know that when they get going with all that energy they understand their size and that the fact that they pack a punch... The last two we adopted at 3 and 4 years of age and had gone through puppy stages before we got them, but that's not to say they didn't have their own issues. My husband and I unfortunately have never been able to have children, the dogs are our kids. It has allowed us to take in some abused dogs with multiple issues through the years. I'm happy for that, but we are getting older and it has gotten harder to control them as our physical capacity to handle them has decreased.

    I am experienced in some of their reactive types of issues Rotties have though, so if I see anything I can help with, I will jump in. Rotties are herding dogs and you can look forward to that behavior after a while. They will herd other dogs, people, children and it's not meant mean or aggressive, it's meant to protect their herd. So... there's that. I think that has been a frequent issue in this forum was when a dog was in herding mode and the owners thought he/she was being aggressive. Just thought I'd mention that.
    big black dogs likes this.

  8. #6
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    Thanks for the replies, sorry it has taken me so long but our weather has been amazing so I am busy teaching Nacho and taking him out socialising and walking and just getting to know his garden area. He is 8mths just and I don't know if its just Mme but it seems some things I am telling him are getting through! We live in a tourist village by the sea and this summer has been overwhelming with people to say the least and its like we are living by a motorway the road is so busy. I have only taken Nacho maybe 4 times back through the village which is walking along the main road until you reach the footpath. Last few times he was way too skittish so I used just park up and open boot and let him listen to the sounds and see what's going on but that he was fine in his boot.
    I took him back a few days ago and he was great, a few skirmishes where I just get him to wait until traffic has calmed down and he waits before he crosses the road and knew where his gate was and would not go past it on the way out! Im meeting the trainer this weekend just for my own peace of mind to know Im doing an ok job. He's a very sociable little fella and had a puppy play date yesterday evening for the first time and was wrecked after....
    The only thing I can't get my head around is that on the return journey back to car he goes all bold and lies down and refuses to move and will not jump into car boot at all... Its when he knows he is closer to car or I mention it to him, he pulls and chews lead and then lies down and won't budge and when I do get him to car he won't jump into boot. He jumped into my cousins with her two no bother and then she tried with one of hers in my boot and he did and yesterday he actually forgot himself and made a go but then must have remembered and turned to cement. He's getting a bit heavy to lift in I can tell you.

  9. #7
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    Jumping into a SUV or van can be harder for some dogs. I find the best way to do it is to teach them to jump...using the same command. Start by teaching your pup to jump onto a bench or couch, or bed....and a command for getting off it also. Lots of praise and treats. I always used "huppp" for my command. Practice till your dog understands the command...then try it with your automobile. You can also use a good treat to lure him to get inside. Usually once they know the jump up command they will jump up on anything. Be careful of jumping out...always kind of guide the dog..so that he does not put too much weight on his elbows coming out.
    Eirian's Fancy Gem CGN TT HIC (April 2009-August 2020) "Jemma"

  10. #8
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    You might want to get a ramp for your vehicle to make it easier on your dog and his joints. Rotties are heavier and joints can be issues on them as they age. Stress on bones and joints should be avoided if possible.

  11. #9
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    He is a funny fella. I do appreciate all the advise here and I am taking it on board,I assure you. I am wondering though at what age I should introduce him to a muzzle as at 8mths he's still growing and changing so surely he doesn't have to be muzzled until he's a year? I take him to vet to have him fitted regardless but Im not clear on what age puppies of said dangerous dog list should be muzzled is all? I never had my GSD muzzled as he was so docile

  12. #10
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    Is it the law for him to be wearing a muzzle?? We don't require that in North America...unless the dog has bitten, or attacked and been deemed dangerous.
    You could start teaching him to wear a muzzle if it's going to be required now...the younger he is the easier it will be for him to tolerate it.
    Eirian's Fancy Gem CGN TT HIC (April 2009-August 2020) "Jemma"

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