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Thread: Best food

  1. #1
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    Best food

    Hi guys just got are first Rottweiler he is 1 1/2 years old 120lb big boy what is the best food to feed him dont know much about his history I have been trying dry food right now but he’s not liking it thanks

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  3. #2
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    Congratulations getting your Rottweiler!! There really is no "best food". Try to find a meat based food...kibble or dry food is usually a good choice when trying to feed a large breed dog. Raw diet, either prepared or home made often is a good choice for a picky eater. You could also try a home cooked diet...always another choice.

    For convenience...start with a good, top quality kibble such as Orijen, Acana, Fromm, Wellness, Merrick,etc. and mix in a bit of canned food, or add some toppers such as plain yogurt, canned sardines, lean cooked meat,etc.

    At a year and a half of age..most of your dogs major growth is done...he will still grow slowly and fill in...but he may not to need to eat as much as you think he does.
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  4. #3
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    Our Rott came with Purina One puppy food.

    She's a good eater -- she doesn't scarf her food. She's the first pup in a while that I can say that about. At 6mos, she's eating about four to six cups per day.

    Additionally, she takes it as a reward when I give it to her during training. No special treats required, though she does love Pup-eroni.

    Just some observations I've made, that may or may not help.

    Regards.

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  6. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wabatuckian View Post
    Our Rott came with Purina One puppy food.

    She's a good eater -- she doesn't scarf her food. She's the first pup in a while that I can say that about. At 6mos, she's eating about four to six cups per day.

    Additionally, she takes it as a reward when I give it to her during training. No special treats required, though she does love Pup-eroni.

    Just some observations I've made, that may or may not help.

    Regards.
    You may want to re-think of what you are feeding your pup. Purina One is a grain based food..and contains very little meat. It has poor quality ingredients including soy, corn, wheat and meat by-products. These ingredients often after a prolonged time of feeding cause ear infections as well as skin problems. Also the food is low in calories at 361 calories per cup. You need to feed your pup 4-6 cups of this food because it is so low in calories and lacking meat. If you move to a higher calorie food...you will need to feed less...and there will be far less poop coming out.

    These are the ingredients in the Purina One Large Breed Puppy: Chicken, Rice Flours, Soybean Meal, Corn Gluten Meal, Chicken By-Product (Source of Glucosamine), Whole Grain Wheat, Whole Grain Corn, Beef Fat Naturally Preserved with Mixed-Tocopherols, Pea Fibre, Glycerin, Dried Egg Product, Fish Oil (Source of DHA), Liver Flavour, Mono and Dicalcium Phosphate, Salt, Calcium Carbonate, Caramel Colour, Dried Carrots, Dried Peas, Potassium Chloride, VItamins [Vitamine E Supplement, Niacin (Vitamin B-#), Vitamin A Supplement, Calcium Pantothen
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  7. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by big black dogs View Post
    You may want to re-think of what you are feeding your pup. Purina One is a grain based food..and contains very little meat. It has poor quality ingredients including soy, corn, wheat and meat by-products. These ingredients often after a prolonged time of feeding cause ear infections as well as skin problems. Also the food is low in calories at 361 calories per cup. You need to feed your pup 4-6 cups of this food because it is so low in calories and lacking meat. If you move to a higher calorie food...you will need to feed less...and there will be far less poop coming out.

    These are the ingredients in the Purina One Large Breed Puppy: Chicken, Rice Flours, Soybean Meal, Corn Gluten Meal, Chicken By-Product (Source of Glucosamine), Whole Grain Wheat, Whole Grain Corn, Beef Fat Naturally Preserved with Mixed-Tocopherols, Pea Fibre, Glycerin, Dried Egg Product, Fish Oil (Source of DHA), Liver Flavour, Mono and Dicalcium Phosphate, Salt, Calcium Carbonate, Caramel Colour, Dried Carrots, Dried Peas, Potassium Chloride, VItamins [Vitamine E Supplement, Niacin (Vitamin B-#), Vitamin A Supplement, Calcium Pantothen
    She seems to be doing OK with it. After it's gone, I'll re-evaluate what we're feeding her.

    She had a sudden transition from her old home to ours, and from living outside to split between inside and out, along with a lot more attention than she'd gotten.

    Point is, she has had a lot to adapt to, and I'm trying to keep as much familiar as possible. For example, she has her old food, her old crate, her old bed, her old doghouse, etc. A number of these things will be phased out over time. The food is probably next to be changed, either after this bag is gone (and will donate the other to the shelter) or after both are gone.

    My parents have an Aussie they get meat-based food for, and I'm studying these now. Until my last dog, a Husky/Lab mix, I'd had no reason to question Purina Dog Chow. However, she developed skin problems and such. I changed her food to a meat and pea food. (I'm now reading that peas in dogfood might be questionable. Still studying.) Later, when she started having grand mal seizures, I began adding bananas and magnesium, which helped a lot.

    Point is, your advice is well-taken, and I'm already on it.

    Regards.

  8. #6
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    Re: peas in dog food - for this reason, we were feeding Agis Fromm's large breed puppy. Has grains and taurine supplemented it. After awhile, him being super picky and never finishing his meals. We were away and the local pet store didn't have Fromm's, so we bought Acana, which we fed our other two before the whole DCM/legume thing (which may be more a lack of taurine).

    He LOVED it. So we told our vet, and said, can we supplement taurine?

    They said yes, and we picked up powdered taurine at our local pet store. He's thriving.
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    Two things I want to add here:

    Wabatuckian: Please listen to BBD advice. While Purina One is a tiny step above other mass-produced crap on the shelves because it has a little more meat than most, it is still not going to be a healthy diet long term. Pupperoni is total crap, I never had a dog that would touch it.

    Commerical dog foods are not regulated by the FDA. Manufactureres do not have to list how many carbs are in the food and there are A Lot of carbs in dog food that cause digestive issues, allergies, weight gain and can lead to cancer. Also, they put a load of fillers and unhealthy meat by-products. The bottom line is they make it for as cheap as possible using the waste that is left over from animals that are processed for human food. We get the steaks, etc. and the animals get the guts, skin even the hair ground up and then cooked to death. The only nutrition in these dog foods has to be added and comes in forms that are mostly not even absorbed by the dog.

    Agis: Just want to say you don't have to buy special supplements from the vet for the ridiculous prices they charge. What is sold for humans will work on dogs. Taurine is found naturally and abundantly in organ meats. Liver is pretty cheap and dogs love it. It needs to be cooked though. Also, I don't know why there would be grain supplements in the dog food.
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    Absolutely Andrea! We did not get the taurine from the vet for that reason - they indicated we could get it cheaper elsewhere - they just told us dosage. The jar we got from the pet store was not expensive ($10?) and will last us months or more. We've been using it for 3 months and I expect it will last around a 9-12 months worth of dosing. So it was a good deal.

    I've given raw liver to the dogs before, was not aware cooked was better. Thanks!

  11. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andrea52 View Post
    Commerical dog foods are not regulated by the FDA. Manufactureres do not have to list how many carbs are in the food and there are A Lot of carbs in dog food that cause digestive issues, allergies, weight gain and can lead to cancer. Also, they put a load of fillers and unhealthy meat by-products. The bottom line is they make it for as cheap as possible using the waste that is left over from animals that are processed for human food. We get the steaks, etc. and the animals get the guts, skin even the hair ground up and then cooked to death. The only nutrition in these dog foods has to be added and comes in forms that are mostly not even absorbed by the dog.
    Just want to reply to this quote. Not all commercial dog foods are alike. There are a few that are top quality...and tell you how much meat, how much carbs,etc. is in their food...and even the source of their meats that go into the foods. Orijen/Acana made in Canada by Champion Foods, as well as Open Farm foods are excellent kibble. Not everyone has room for an extra freezer, or the ability to have a steady supply of meat available to feed raw. It can be very expensive to feed a raw diet (meat prices around here have gone sky high)!! Many of the commercial foods made by Purina, Iams, etc...do use poor quality ingredients...that are left overs from companies that make human foods. Cheap grain leftovers ,and corn, soy are used in the foods to raise the protein in the foods because there is so little meat in the foods. When a company says that meat is the # 1 ingredients in their food...it really is false. Ingredients are based on weight....if it says chicken (it still has water in the meat to weigh more), then come the grains. The grains are split....so it's corn, corn meal, wheat, wheat middlings, soy, soy-byproduct ,etc. If you add up the grains/corn/soy...it's 6 parts to one part meat. Means there is hardly any meat. A meat based food usually has the first 1-3 or even 4 ingredients that are meat.

    I would always rather pay for a good meat based food...instead of paying the vet later on. The dog needs to eat way less...and it comes about the same cost wise. Some people cannot justify, or afford to pay more for a bag of food...then supplement the diet with some raw, some cooked, and healthy leftovers, a can of sardines,etc. I often dig into my freezer...and find some freezer burned meat...throw it into a slow cooker/crock pot...add some veggies that have seen better days, add a bit of water...and 3-4 hours later...a nice mish mash stew to add as a topper for kibble.

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    Everyone has said so many good things about diet. I agree. I always check on what I'm buying for my dogs to eat and do not buy unless it says where the food is made and NOT in China or India. I feed Honest Kitchen organic freeze-dried food and kibble, along with meat and cottage cheese and flax and my dogs are healthy.

    What you feed your dog is especially important to fend off cancer. We have had cancer end every one of our dogs lives so far (8 Rotties, several other breeds over the past 40 plus years). The ones that got fed organic cottage cheese and organic flax have lived longer and healthier lives, but other than that I have no magic bullet for cancer. I wish I did. Rotties are especially prone to cancer. We have experienced bone cancer 3x, melanomas, lymph, liver cancer, etc. It just kills you... and stepping up to the plate (excuse the pun) and feeding healthier food is a more cost effective way of keeping your dog healthy rather than spending it on vet bills for cancer treatment or developmental issues from poor food while growing up.

    I agree with the posts above. Purina is junk food for dogs. Many years ago before corporations took over production it may not have been so, but now they are pretty horrible. I met someone who had been feeding that to her dog and when her dog became diabetic her vet told her it was the food that did it to him.

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