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Thread: A Pledge for Rottie Owners

  1. #1
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    1. I will socialize my dog from a very early age and continue throughout its life.
    Expose your dog to people and other dogs of all shapes and sizes. The early socialization skills you teach your dogwill set the foundation of how he or she reacts to different situations throughout its life. Remember, each Rottie is an ambassador for its breed and you have the responsibility to always represent this breed in a positive manner.

    2. I will learn how to be a calm, assertive and benevolent leader for my Rottie. These dogs do not react well to harsh forms of discipline and the use of them may actually create an environment that forces your dog into an aggressive defense strategy. At the very least, they erode the dog’s trust in you and put you in the position of having to be meaner and stronger than your dog on the next round. Learn everything you can about establishing leadership principals using positive methods of reinforcement. Know that techniques that work with a puppy may not be appropriate for a more mature dog.

    3. I will understand the tools available in the world of training today and learn how and why they work and how to use each one correctly. It’s fine to use a prong collar if that is the best tool for your dog, but remember this any tool you elect to use can cause severe physical injury to your much loved companion when used or fitted incorrectly.

    4. I will begin training my dog early and continue throughout its life. Covering the basics of bite inhibition, sit, stay, wait, come and down are not enough for this breed. Add the leave it, settle, drop and enough commands for added security. Your dog should also have a trained off switch so that in an emergency, he or she will stop immediately, whatever it is they are doing, and drop into a down/stay position until you release them.

    If you need help, contact a professional trainer who has experience with large breeds. There are low cost programs available at most local Humane Societies. Also, most professional trainers will work with their fees for some clients. An ethical trainer would rather see a happy, well balanced dog in the community than money in their pocket. Select a trainer that uses a balanced approach - they are best suited to teach you how to issue corrections properly. The training program should be one that is specifically geared to your dog’s personality and challenges.

    And remember, training doesn’t end when the class is over. It goes on for life!


    5. I will not encourage my dog to guard or protect - without being 100% certain I have given her the tools to decide what is proper and appropriate. In the absence of having a solid and proofed training foundation, you are likely to get more than you’ve bargained for.


    6. I will protect my dog’s health and physical well-being. This means annual or semi-annual vet checks, staying current on all inoculations, providingregular flea and heartworm treatment (if you live in an area that requires this), feeding a high quality food product and providing a regular exercise program.

    Preferably, you should have a securely fenced yard or other area such as a large kennel run. Gates should be locked so that no one can enter the yard in your absence. This protects your dog from stupid people or someone who may want to hurt him or steal him. Be prepared to share the inside of your home with your rottie. Not only do they WANT to be near their people they NEED to be near their people.


    7. I will spay or neuter my dog. Unless you own a future great show dog, there is no reason to leave your companion pet intact. If you have thoughts of breeding your dog don’t. The responsibilities of breeding this dog are best left to the professionals.

    There are countless health benefits to both sexes when an animal is altered. Major benefits are less risk of testicular cancer for the boys, less risk of mammary cancer for the girls and others too numerous to mention.

    From the emotional well being perspective males are less likely to try to escape and are far less likely to exhibit the traits of trying to dominate other animals, the elderly or weak and children. Females tend to be less edgy and moody.

    An important point is that unaltered male Rottweilers are responsible for a disproportionate number of fatal dog attacks. It’s a horrible statistic but all Rottie owners bear the burden.

    8. I will work my dog every day! Rotties need to work and require lots of mental stimulation. You should work your dog 3 4 times a day for at least 15 minutes each time on practicing his obedience skills. Work in different locations and under different distractions. Find ways to turn your play sessions into training sessions.

    Have fun with your dog explore getting a Canine Good Citizen certification or consider doing therapy work. Join a cart club, a search and rescue club or just get a group of friends and their dogs together and have some fun!


    9. I will seek professional help if and when necessary. If your dog consistently growls or snaps, disobeys basic commands, and generally acts like a spoiled brat it’s time to call a pro. Don’t make excuses for your dog he’s tired, or she isn’t feeling well, or he just didn’t want to sit right then. The finest skill that you can give your dog is the execution of discipline, self control and patience in all situations. There is no place in today’s home or world for an uncontrolled animal.

    10. I will love my dog for the rest of my life and care for him for the rest of HIS life. I understand that this living, breathing and loving animal is not like a piece of furniture to be gotten rid of when I am bored with it. If my life situation must change, I will be sure that my new plans include my Rottie because leaving him behind would be like leaving a much loved family member behind. If all fails, I will place my friend with a Breed Rescue group or no-kill shelter.

    I will take care that I am financially able to provide for this dog for the rest of its life and I am willing to eat beanie weenies while my dog has premium food and health care.

    Most of all, every day, I will take care to be a human worthy of my dog’s respect and loyalty. I will always remember and be grateful that I am so lucky to have such a loyal and loving companion with which to share my life.
    Last edited by huntinghawk; 10-12-2010 at 12:25 PM. Reason: upgraded

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  3. #2

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    I think this could and should pertain to all dogs.


    Barb

  4. #3
    Senior Member Nutz4Rotz's Avatar
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    Yup. I agree.
    Nutz

    "If you pick up a starving dog and make him prosperous, he will not bite you. This is the principal difference between a dog and a man."

    -- Mark Twain

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  6. #4

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    me too

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    Well I wrote this for my Bully Breed Love Class - I'm a trainer at the Humane Society. You would all be surprised at the dogs I see and the things that people have done to them. Lot's of people get these dogs for the wrong reasons then just don't know what to do with them.


    Humane Education is a large part of what I do as a trainer. I haven't been on the site in awhile and visited yesterday. I've been busy with seminars, exams, my husband had a heart attack - you know - just all the stuff of life!


    You're right that this should pertain to all dogs but Rotties are the breed closest to my heart and they are the ones I see mishandled the most. Let's face it - if a little guy nips someone it's a problem. When a Rottie bites it can be disastrous.


    I just wanted to put something on paper to make people THINK b-4 they run out to that pet store or breeder and pick out that furry little Rottie puppy! And, usually after reading this and spending a few minutes talking to me they decide that maybe a Rottie isn't the best choice for them! That's a good thing.


    I thought maybesome of you could use it too as you are talking to people considering sharing thier homes with a Rottie.


    Jeannie
    ROL Admin

  8. #6
    Senior Member Nutz4Rotz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rottie1_223


    Well I wrote this for my Bully Breed Love Class - I'm a trainer at the Humane Society. You would all be surprised at the dogs I see and the things that people have done to them. Lot's of people get these dogs for the wrong reasons then just don't know what to do with them.


    Humane Education is a large part of what I do as a trainer. I haven't been on the site in awhile and visited yesterday. I've been busy with seminars, exams, my husband had a heart attack - you know - just all the stuff of life!


    You're right that this should pertain to all dogs but Rotties are the breed closest to my heart and they are the ones I see mishandled the most. Let's face it - if a little guy nips someone it's a problem. When a Rottie bites it can be disastrous.


    I just wanted to put something on paper to make people THINK b-4 they run out to that pet store or breeder and pick out that furry little Rottie puppy! And, usually after reading this and spending a few minutes talking to me they decide that maybe a Rottie isn't the best choice for them! That's a good thing.


    I thought maybesome of you could use it too as you are talking to people considering sharing thier homes with a Rottie.


    Sorry to hear about your husband. It's good to have a person like you here to help educate. It is hard not to look at these cute little pups as a potential companion dog. Sometimes, I hear people that think of them as would think of a child or baby and they are far from it. Some think it's the breed for them and once they get them, they are disillusioned as the pup grows at a rapid pace. They are clueless when they mouth, nip or bite. Some know what to do, or how to go about getting help to resolve, but most dump them at the first opportunity. It is unfortunate and sad.


    On the other side of the extreme, you have some that want to change the image of the breed so bad, they snap pictures of them with their children or even babies which IMHO gives others the idea they can do this too. Then you read trajedy after trajedy of children beingmauled sometimes to death. I was thinking the other day about some of the sites out there that are blunt in their comments about people seeking this breed. I am inclined myself to believe that maybe as harsh as this is sometimes, it's the best medicine. Seeing how hundreds of these dogs are put down everyday that this is as harsh as it is, is the best thing for the breed if it is to survive and having the right to owership is still possible.


    I just had some things on my mind and thought a conversation with someone like yourself might help educate someone.


    Thanks and Welcome back. [img]smileys/smiley1.gif[/img]
    Nutz

    "If you pick up a starving dog and make him prosperous, he will not bite you. This is the principal difference between a dog and a man."

    -- Mark Twain

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    Thanks - I'm glad to be back.


    It's hard for me - I love Rottie's - have a beautiful 3 year old girl that I adore and goes almost everywhere with me anda 2 year old pit bull that I rescued. You wouldn't believe the things I see in training.


    I'm at at a no-kill shelter which means we HAVE to try to save each dog. But sometimes we just can't. You can't take a pit or a Rottie and chain it in your backyard and expect to have a well balanced family pet. People do stupid things and the dogpays the price. What a waste.


    It breaks your heart to see such a beautiful animal have to be put down beacuse of stupidity. I don't know what else to call it - some people are just plain dumb when it comes to this breed.


    The one thing we can all do is try to educate everyone about the truth of this breed and other bully breeds. That's where our Humane Education comes in - we go into schools and help kids to understand this breed, pit bulls and other breeds that are misaligned and prone to be abused for human gain. Kids want them because they look tough and are bigger than life. We teach that having an animal like thiscomes with a huge responsibility. You better be sure you can live up to it. More and more, we educate people to choose a dog based on their lifestyle and backgrounds - not on the cute picture you see in the books.


    You're right - the best thing we can all do for this breed is to communicate to the public - loudly and clearly - this is not a breed for the casual dog owner or the inexperienced owner.


    And, if responsible Rottie owners don't take the time and care to do this - the law will do it for us.


    Jeannie
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    Senior Member Nutz4Rotz's Avatar
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    Well, thanks for the work you do. At least some have a chance at redemption. Isn't dog training really people training? Over the years, I've heard of so many horrific things about the PBT's and couldn't see why someone would own one. Then I see people like rutlyr's roommate raising, training, showing these beautiful animals and they change my view of what I only heard. In fact, I think she's taught me (inadvertantly) that there are no bad dogs, just bad owners. I would replace bad owners with stupid owners.


    While we're at this point, how do your feel about people seeking dogs (of any breed) for personalprotection?


    Thanks.
    Nutz

    "If you pick up a starving dog and make him prosperous, he will not bite you. This is the principal difference between a dog and a man."

    -- Mark Twain

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    Well, you are right - it is all about training people to train their dogs. A huge part of the process is helping owners to understand how/why the dog thinks and acts - well - just like a dog. Too many people put the burden of human characteristics on dogs and have very unrealsitic expectations of what being responsible for and training a dog is really like.


    PBT's can be and in many cases are great dogs. We've ruined the breed by not investigating and prosecuting people who breed these dogs to fight. In my case, my little red nose pit is one of the best and smartest dogs I've ever owned. In England, they are known as the Nanny Dog because they are so good with children. Then we take the breed, breed in a higher prey drive, no bite inhibition and other bad traits and we get what we have now. I get to work with alot of them at the shelter. If I get them soon enough I can usually turn them around. But then you're faced with who do you adopt them to. It's the unsavory people who want them in most cases and we don't adopt to people like that. That's how I got mine.


    Personal protection is a hot topic for most trainers. In my opinion, protection trained dogs lose some of the "pet" characteristics that the average dog owner wants. These dogs have to be handled much differently and what if - just what if - your neighbor's kid accidently opens the front door.


    Thankfully, all the trainers I know personally and are in the larger training associations have exteremly strict guidlines for helping people with these kinds of requests. There are moral and ethical implications involved and a good trainer knows they must abide by those.


    I personally don't do protection work - but in the right circumstances with the right person, I would refer the client to a trainer who does.


    Hope that answers your questions!
    Jeannie
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  12. #10
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    Well, you are right - it is all about training people to train their dogs. A huge part of the process is helping owners to understand how/why the dog thinks and acts - well - just like a dog. Too many people put the burden of human characteristics on dogs and have very unrealsitic expectations of what being responsible for and training a dog is really like.

    Yeah, I see that and have been guilty of that a time or two. I have to remind myself to see things the way they do. That's why I like my trainer, she's there if I have a question and nine times out of ten, it's something I'm doing that causes the behavior I dislike. (I hate that) But at the same time it's good because I can fix me.


    PBT's can be and in many cases are great dogs. We've ruined the breed by not investigating and prosecuting people who breed these dogs to fight. In my case, my little red nose pit is one of the best and smartest dogs I've ever owned. In England, they are known as the Nanny Dog because they are so good with children. Then we take the breed, breed in a higher prey drive, no bite inhibition and other bad traits and we get what we have now. I get to work with alot of them at the shelter. If I get them soon enough I can usually turn them around. But then you're faced with who do you adopt them to. It's the unsavory people who want them in most cases and we don't adopt to people like that. That's how I got mine.

    I agree 100%. I admire them, respect them, but know I am not one for this breed.




    Personal protection is a hot topic for most trainers. In my opinion, protection trained dogs lose some of the "pet" characteristics that the average dog owner wants. These dogs have to be handled much differently and what if - just what if - your neighbor's kid accidently opens the front door.


    Thankfully, all the trainers I know personally and are in the larger training associations have exteremly strict guidlines for helping people with these kinds of requests. There are moral and ethical implications involved and a good trainer knows they must abide by those.


    I personally don't do protection work - but in the right circumstances with the right person, I would refer the client to a trainer who does.


    Hope that answers your questions!

    Yeah, I know. Couple other boards I check in with are full of people with negative opinions on PP dogs. I myself don't want my dog's protection. I did speak with my insurance agent and the liability premiums are high. Just the mention of her breed cost me, but because she's personal pet/companion and in training, he's not sticking it to me. I tell you, I won't loose my house in a lawsuit. Hopefully it will never happen cause I don't bring out that behavior. My last one was with me 12 years and never so much as growled at anyone let alone bit. I think the possibility was there by instinct if someone tried to harm one of us.But I am glad shenever felt she had to. I hope Sadie is with us that long and is that well tempered.


    Yes, thanks again. The information is great and I know it will help someone else down the road. It's nice to have these conversations and raise that level of awareness to help foster responsible owners.


    Best wishes.
    Nutz

    "If you pick up a starving dog and make him prosperous, he will not bite you. This is the principal difference between a dog and a man."

    -- Mark Twain

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