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Thread: Very aggressive Males

  1. #1
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    Very aggressive Males

    Hello everybody. I have a three year old male, intact, and an 11 month old boy, intact. We also have a 1 year old female, not intact, who has not ever been an issue within the pack.
    The older male has always shown his dominance by mounting, taking the other male down and holding him down for a few seconds, snarling when he gets too close to his food...
    Last week, the oldest male snapped at the younger male, and the young male grabbed him by the neck , pinned him down, and held him there for a good minute, until I pried his jaws apart.
    The same thing happened this morning, but this time, the oldest latched on, too.
    They get along 99% of the time, this is new behavior for the pup.
    Please help me out. We do not wish to get rid of any of them, but we are at a loss.
    They are all crate trained, they all go on walks together multiple times per day.
    Thank you.

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  3. #2
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    Well, I will give a general dog response, not Rottie-specific -

    -don't let one dog mount the other, or pin him like it sounds like you've allowed your older male to do. You are the pack leader, you should be stepping in before/as this happens to stop this.
    -don't feed them close together - everyone should get to eat in peace. If they're crate trained, feed them in their crate

    It's a lot of hormones floating around, two young males. You'll need to work to reestablish their relationship (and that it should defer to you). For now, me personally, I'd crate and rotate if you can't have two adults each controlling one dog. Leash to you for now, nothing in life is free - they should be in boot camp. Where is the female when they are being aggressive? Is there some resource guarding going on with her?
    Steph King likes this.

  4. #3
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    Thank you for the advice. The female is always with us in the yard/kennel. She does not cause any issues. They all, generally speaking, play really well together.
    These two isolated incidents have us questioning what to do.

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  6. #4
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    Welcome to the forum! Rottweilers as a breed are same sex aggressive. You have an up and coming pup that is reaching sexual maturity. You have lots of trouble ahead of you if you do not make any changes. Do not allow the older dog to mount, or put his head up on the other dogs neck. If you want to try to make this work without the dogs end up killing each other there are some things you are going to have to do.

    First thing would be to neuter both of the dogs. All of the extra testosterone is making life difficult for them, and for you. Then I would really work on training...do not let either dog pose, give a look, grumble, freeze,etc. You need to learn body language and to stop things from starting right away with a command. You also need to know and see their triggers.

    The more chances they get into it...the more often they will fight. I would get a breaking stick...and learn how to use it. Have a plan on what to do if they start fighting. Do not put your hands into the fray...or there is a very good chance that you will get seriously hurt!!

    Having two intact male Rottweilers living in the same household is very dangerous. I would start thinking of a 'plan B'...if after neutering and heavy training things are still not good between the two dogs. You may have to rehome one, or live a crate and rotate life for many years.
    Steph King likes this.

  7. #5
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    Thank you for the advice, Big Black Dogs. My first notion was to have them both neutered. You believe that will curb their aggressiveness enough to make a difference?

  8. #6
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    I think the neutering will take the testosterone levels down....and make things easier. It will not be a quick fix. With neutering and with more obedience training …..things should get better. I have fostered intact male Rottweilers, and once they were neutered (as required by the rescue)….the dog aggression got way better. Having two males so close in age is not ideal...either neutered or not. The first step would be neutering. It will take awhile till the hormones leave (about 3 weeks or so). Then try to figure out who is the dominant dog (it could be the younger dog??)….then take it from there with boot camp training. Look up NILIF and use it in every day life. I've had 2 males and a female...that all lived together. All were neutered/spayed. There was a big age gap between the males though like 7 years age gap. I think that makes a difference also.

    Let us know how things go. You may also want to consult with a trainer that is educated on working dogs. They could do an in home visit ..and see what things you could improve on with your behavior.
    Steph King likes this.

  9. #7
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    Any update on how things are going between your two male dogs? I'm hoping that things are slowly starting to get better.
    Let us know how things are going. It's not easy living with two dogs that want to fight...makes lots of tension, and worry.

  10. #8
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    We have been doing the crate and rotate method. We are in between houses at the moment. We are building our new house and living in a rental.
    The young female and male stay crater all day, and the oldest male stays out in the house. The all get walked, separately, in the morning, and again in the afternoon.
    After their afternoon walks they two pups go outside in a 16 x 16 kennel, and we hose them down for an hour or two(they love that). While Maximus, my oldest stays next to me on the porch.
    Then, once back inside, Maximus will go in the bedroom, where he is content, and the pups get the house for two hours or so. Then they go to bed and repeat.
    I have had Maximus, the oldest, sit across the room while I take Caesar outside, all is good there. My wife is terrified they are going to kill each other and wants them to remain apart permanently.
    Last night, I let the two males get close to one another with me in between, and both tales were wagging vigorously, no incident. Both were on leash.
    Last edited by Timit-Tor-Pup; 06-19-2020 at 09:38 PM.

  11. #9
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    In the past, many years ago, we were foolish enough to have two male Rotties around the same age. (didn't know any better) We exerted our pack leadership and they rarely scuffled and would break apart at our voice commands. One we had raised from a pup Haus, and the other adopted at 2 y.o. Zeus Voice was enough to keep them apart most of the time, although I believe my husband had to grab both by the scruffs of the neck and pull them apart a couple of times. They never did any damage to each other. Later on we adopted a third Rottie male, younger, but he had been abused and gone from home to home a few times and when he landed with us he was so happy to be in our house he was very subservient to the eldest alpha Rott. Haus would come home and Snacks would run up to him and lick his jowls in suservience to let him know he wasn't a challenge to him. Haus hated it but put up with it with a lot of grumbling and showing of teeth. It was kind of funny to see. The #2 Rott Zeus was never a problem for any of the other dogs. He was super smart and had a very mellow temperament. The only time he ever retaliated with Haus was when there was a ball involved, because he was an obsessive ball player.

    With Rotts you have to be careful in disciplining them too, because sometimes when you discipline one the other will want to step in and "help you." I had a scary time once with the current two Rotts I have and a shep/rott mix (who is now currently deceased). We had just gotten the 140 lb male a few weeks before and I was alone with all three in my office and trying to get them out the door to the car to go home. The big male, Rocky was jumping up on me and when I discouraged that the other two dogs decided they would "help" me by disciplining him. (Other two dogs being a very strong alpha female Fiona at around 80 lbs and a shep/rott mix Moqui at about 70 lbs.) The big male didn't take it from my experience with him before with the other dogs, so prospects didn't look good. I was alone with all 3 dogs and in my head I'm thinking, "oh crap, if they start fighting I'm doomed." So I grabbed the big one's collar to hold him back and yelled and kicked at the other two to get them away from him and that managed to defuse the situation. You need to be very careful with this type of situation. It was my fault for disciplining the big one with the other two in close quarters.
    Last edited by Steph King; 06-20-2020 at 02:44 PM.

  12. #10
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    Thank you for sharing your experience. That is very helpful.

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