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Thread: Need help dog zummies and jumps and aggressively bites

  1. #1
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    Need help dog zummies and jumps and aggressively bites

    Hello I have a 7 month old Rottweiler this is my first time owning a Rottweiler and we have been having issues with her Zumming out and then jumping and biting and she will bite hard I’m quite concerned because other training tools trainers have given us have not worked I have t wo daughters who will need to walk this dog when I am not home and I’m quite concerned someone will get hurt she has bitten me during these zummie outbreaks and it can be quite scary I’m looking for support and help I don’t want anything happening to my family or this dog we have a good schedule layed our she goes to dog park first this in morning with kids to play ball and bond 15-20 mins then we do some training with her then take her home put her in kennel for breakfast and a few hours to get used to being in there when I’m going back to work then she will come out go for pee poop and play after this is will be time for a nap she will sleep for 2-3 hours and come out eat play and chill then will get put back in kennel and then back out for dinner walk and chill we find the zuumies often hit when going to bathroom at night she will then chill out and go in house and then be put to bed around 9-10 another issue with zumies is we are not a fenced yard we live in the country with 1 acer please if you could help that would mean alot

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  3. #2
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    Welcome to the forums! For some reason I found both of the threads that you had started, deleted. I am posting this thread, with hopes that you get some help from the members.

    Zoomies as they are called are very common in all breeds. It seems young dogs get a second wind...and just get too much energy and need to get it out some how.

    At 7 months from reading your other thread...I don't think she is getting enough exercise. The older she gets the more exercise she is going to need. This is a working breed...she needs to tire her body, and her brain...and she needs a job to do.

    She is going to be at the age, where going to the dog park is not going to work anymore. This is not a "dog park" breed once they reach maturity. They can be quick to get involved in same sex aggression, or just not like certain dogs. They may not start a fight, but the Rottweiler will be the first dog blamed. You will need to find another way to exercise and work her.

    If you have an acre of land...then put a long line on her....something fairly light....that she can drag without getting it caught...around 15-20 feet long. This will help you with recalls, and with playing fetch, etc. You will always be able to control her.

    In the evening when she starts the zoomies....engage her in a game of tug. Make sure she learns 'drop it', and understands that she has to stop, she she is told. Get involved in teaching her how to track. Lay a trail of kibble dragging your feet in the grass when you lay the track. Start with a simple straight track...with a squeaky toy at the end as her reward. Tell her "find it'''and point your finger to the ground...and praise when she gets to the end of the track. You can start making it more complicated the faster she learns....less kibble and train her to follow your 'foot track'...put some turns in,etc.

    Have you got her enrolled in an obedience class?? It would be good if she could get into a class...and learn with distractions and other dogs around. Train every day for 5-10 minutes at a time...for two or three times per day.

    When she starts jumping and mouthing you...give her a deep voiced "OFF"...tuck your arms in and turn around and walk away, or grab the long line and into the house she goes...end of fun and games. She will start understanding that fun stops when she starts jumping and mouthing. She will get stronger and bigger...and this you need to get under control. Also, when you see her starting to get worked up...distract her...reel her long line in...and make her do some obedience drills..."sit"/"down"/"stand"/"shake",etc. So her mind forgets all about acting up....LOL

  4. #3
    Junior Member Whskyrottn's Avatar
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    I agree, sounds like your pup needs more exercise. I currently have a 10 month old male Rottie (my 5th Rottweiler), and he’s crazy lol. We walk a mile or two in the morning, play a little at lunch, walk/jog at night for 2-3 miles, and play fetch after our run. He also does nose work training and is in the local kennel club for obedience and trick training once a week . We incorporate training in his day to day, and have little mini sessions daily for obedience and nose work refreshers. He started swim lessons a few months ago too, and we do hikes on moderate trails on nice weekends. We also do NOT attend the dog park, just too many things can wrong. Instead he plays with my friends’ dogs, and one of my trainer’s packs, and goes to a stringent doggy day care - all well supervised. Problem with most people is they don’t take training classes, so they have no idea how to read their dog’s body language. Their dog gives many signals they’re uncomfortable with a situation, but the owner isn’t reading it, and then their dog snaps and the owner is “shocked because that’s so unlike their dog.” When the whole situation could’ve been prevented several times before their dog reacted. And my dog is also still mouthy at 10 months, it’s a work in progress. He literally bit NONSTOP as a baby, now it’s just when he wants to play sometimes. When he bites I shut the nearest door or gate on him, or I put him in a time out in his crate for a few minutes. If I can sense he’s going to do it (and he doesn’t just run up from behind and bite my butt lol) I put him in a sit stay and make him do a trick. You have to pull your dog out of their instinctive state of mind and make them think. When Jack was much younger he was the worst dog ever lol, burned through like 4 trainers before I found one that was more of a behaviorist. What also helped his energy was puppy puzzles and feeding all his meals in a weeble wobble at first. I’d just get creative and take every opportunity to make something a training session or physical activity (even if you’re too tired to walk, try having your dog chase a laser pointer- my rotts love them). And make them work for EVERYTHING. If they want dinner? Sit, wait, and then I signal go ahead and eat. They want to go outside? Sit, wait, and signal to go ahead over the threshold, etc. keep them thinking! Hope some of this helps!
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    Great advice by Whskyrottn!! The only thing I disagree with is using the laser pointer to exercise your dog. These laser pointers can often lead to obsessive compulsive behavior in dogs. Since they can never catch them, they often become focused on other light beams...and it becomes a terrible compulsive behavior.
    Ditch the laser pointer...I've seen a few dogs ruined with them. A very hard thing to fix once it becomes compulsive.

  7. #5
    Junior Member Whskyrottn's Avatar
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    That’s interesting, I’ve never heard of that before with the laser pointer. I’ve used it with all my rotts with no issues. They usually go hard for like 5 minutes with it before losing interest lol. But I typically only bring it out if it’s raining and we can’t walk. I haven’t seen them become compulsive with any other light sources either. Just sharing my personal experiences. Another thing I’ve found that Jack loves is a lure pole. Just a long pole with a rope, and strips of fabric or a toy attached to the end. He’ll chase that forever if you let him!

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    There's lots of information about not using laser pointers for dogs. I just did a quick google search and found this :https://www.akc.org/expert-advice/li...tion-than-fun/

    Not a good item to use for dogs with high prey drive like Rottweilers.

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    Junior Member Whskyrottn's Avatar
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    I never heard of that before, guess you’re never to old to learn something new lol! Good information, and luckily I have flirt poles already, so we’ll just stick with that. Thanks!
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    I did not know that this was called "Zummies". My GSD used to go mad and run around when you thought all was good so I taught him to " run it off". You could usually tell when Sudden was about to have a moment as we called it so I would tell him to go run it off and he would run around the garden or area he was in and just use all his energy up and then he was happy. I had the kids taught to stand still if he did this and I wasn't there( you could trust this dog 100% with the kids alone) just in case he bumped into them by accident. Sudden died this May at the age of 9 and I still miss him so much.
    I am currently teaching Nacho my now 9mth Rottweiler to do the same instead of launching himself at me and giving out to me!!!!

  11. #9
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    Not called "Zummies"....it's called Zoomies. Common to most young dogs...and even older dogs get them once in awhile.
    Eirian's Fancy Gem CGN TT HIC (April 2009-August 2020) "Jemma"

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    Regarding the laser pointer, I have never had a bad experience with it either, and this is over 35 years and ten rotts. I understand some people overuse it, but we have only brought it out for limited time and have never had a problem with it. Some dogs play with it for a while and get bored, some obsess and bark at it, some ignore it. Currently we use it to bring the big dogs in the house from the car when they start running down the street smelling and don't listen to us because they are overwhelmed by the smells they don't normally come in contact with. Pull the laser pointer out and direct them home. They come running and we then put it away after achieving our goal. Like most things in life, in moderation can be OK.

    Is there a reason the person posting about the zoomies and over-reactiveness keeps the dog in a kennel and not in the house with the family? Rotties are family dogs and enjoy being with their people. Your dog's freakout level might be not just a lack of exercise, but the overexcitment of being with his people. The dog might settle down more if it was allowed to live with the family and contact with his people was consistent and more frequent. Just a thought... I personally love having my dogs at my feet at home, in the office, everywhere I go. I never understood why people kennel dogs unless they have to go on a trip and it's the only option. My dogs are my family. Besides that, if you have a break-in, your dog will be the first to alert you or keep a predator out. They are handy that way.

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