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Thread: "Agression" issues. I NEED HELP! WHAT DO I DO?!

  1. #1
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    Exclamation "Agression" issues. I NEED HELP! WHAT DO I DO?!

    I have a 3yr old full-blooded American Rottweiler Male. He is fine with both of my parents, and me most of the time. About two weeks ago he bit me and put about an inch deep hole in my arm and did not even growl at me or nothing he just did it. Now I can't even get close to him with out him growling, puting his tail straight up, and his hair standing up. I am the one that spends the most amount of time with him and I am the one that takes care of him. My dad does not want to get him fixed so that is not an option. Yes he needs more room to run but my dad will not sell or get rid of him. Even though I want to keep him I know that would be for the best if he went to a farm and "worked" and had more room to run. My mom & I wonder if it has anything to do with hormonal issues because I am 15, so we wonder if me and him both going through puberty at the same time has anything to do with this. Does anyone else know of anything that I can do because we can not keep living like this?

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  3. #2
    Senior Member huntinghawk's Avatar
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    Not sure where you live, but you need to locate a dog trainer to determine what the issue is & how to correct it.

    Most damage to people & homes are from unaltered males. 90% of road killed dogs are unaltered males.

    Ross

  4. #3
    Senior Member RottiMomCT's Avatar
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    What were you doing when the dog bit you (and please do NOT say you were doing nothing because it is RARELY nothing).

    You say the dog is yours - do you pay for his medical care? Are you listed on the contract as the owners? If so, YOU have the right to make the decisions regarding whether or not he is neutered.

    If you don't feel safe around the dog and your father isn't willing to listen to YOUR reasons, then I honestly feel that animal control should be contacted - if the dog is dangerous and biting family members and your father isn't concerned - it is also an issue to be taken up with Family Services.

    Has the dog been seen recently for any medical conditions that could be causing pain? Neutering will not 'cure' aggression, however it CAN help - so it SHOULD be done - ASAP.
    Anne
    Forever mom to:
    Phoenix's Cabaret Lady RN, CGC (Neelah)
    A Little Xtra Jolt O'Java RA, CGC (Jayda)

    At the Bridge -
    my heart dog, the one who started it all:
    North East's Oxford Scholar CD, RN,CGC, TT (Ben) 4/16/99 - 6/20/11
    and his nemesis -
    Ace Fighter Pilot (Baron) ~9/4/2001 - 11/23/11

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  6. #4
    Senior Member FL Cracker's Avatar
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    * Keep in mind that your dog's snarling/barking/growling is actually rewarded and therefore reinforced each time you back off. Your dog believes his behavior has worked and is much more likely to try the same thing again in future. Note: This doesn't necessarily mean you shouldn't back off in this situation - more on this later.

    * Involve all of your family members in this aggression training. You must convey a unified and consistent message to your dog in order to successfully reverse this behavior.

    * Take control of feeding time. You control the time and place of dinner time - own the food!

    * Make your dog earn any food. Just simple tasks like requesting a sit or a down stay before you put the food bowl down are a good start.

    * Don't let your dog "win" the food through growling, this would reward the very behavior you are trying to eradicate. Don't bully or intimidate your dog though, it's much better to make him actually like having you around at meal time (follow the tips below to achieve this).

    * Never respond to canine aggression with aggression of your own. In essence what this does is to lock you and your dog into a battle of wills. Your dog's next move will most likely be to step up his level of aggression in order to counter your action.

    Firstly, be careful. If you believe your dog poses any real physical threat to you or family members I'd advise getting professional help. Speak to a professional dog trainer or animal behaviorist for more information.

    Mix it up, show your dog who is boss!

    * Hand feed your dogs. Eventually you should even be able to stick your hands into your dogs bowl while he is eating without any sign of aggression.

    * Stroke and pet your dog while he is eating and at the same time talk to him in a calming tone. All you are doing at this point is showing your dog that it is a good thing for you to be around.

    * Stand at a distance your dog is comfortable with, then gradually reduce this distance over time. You can flick a few treats in (or near) the food bowl as you slowly reduce the distance.

    * Put your dogs bowl down with nothing in it, your dog will look back at you as though you are crazy. He'll then literally beg you to come over and fill his bowl.

    * Feed your dog as normal but hold back a few pieces of his meal. When he is finished licking the bowl, he'll look back up at you, then you can come over and give him the remaining food.

    * Drop a few of your dog's very favorite treats into his bowl each time you walk past it. After a while of doing this your dog will welcome the sight of you approaching the bowl.

    * When your dog is eating, call him over to you, when he gets to you reward him, make it worth his while then let him back to the food bowl.

    * While you are preparing your dogs meal put him in a down-stay or sit position, only release him from your command once you have put his bowl down. By doing this you are controlling meal time and establishing (or re-establishing) your role as your dogs leader.

    * Work with another family member on this technique. Put your dog in his collar and leash and have him sit with your helper while you prepare the food. When you are ready release your dog and allow him his food. Again you are controlling the situation.

    * Try the "Trade Up Method". What you do is take away the food or toy your dog is guarding, and replace it with something better. You can use an obedience command such as "give" or "leave it" to encourage your dog to release the precious resource he is guarding. You then take this resource (the food or toy) and give the trade up item to your dog. Once your dog has finished with the new item, you can then give back the resource you took away. This technique proves to your dog that he will receive something great for giving something up, it will recondition his thinking.

    Pit Bull, German Shepherd, Rottweiler - Aggressive Dog Behavior Training and Treatment

    Insights On Fixing Aggression Problems - Dog Aggression Training Article

  7. #5
    Senior Member PAGreatDog's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RottiMomCT View Post
    .....

    If you don't feel safe around the dog and your father isn't willing to listen to YOUR reasons, then I honestly feel that animal control should be contacted - if the dog is dangerous and biting family members and your father isn't concerned - it is also an issue to be taken up with Family Services.

    Has the dog been seen recently for any medical conditions that could be causing pain? Neutering will not 'cure' aggression, however it CAN help - so it SHOULD be done - ASAP.
    I second all the Anne has said. You have received good advice from the other posts as well. My primary concern is that you are not getting support for this problem from your family, and without their being 100% behind the necessary steps to correct this, you are not going to solve this problem. If you do get a trainer, make sure he/she doesn't use any abusive methods to the training. As explained, any aggression toward the dog will only escalate his aggression. I want to dispell some misconceptions in your post as well. Your dog doesn't need more room to run - if he is getting the exercise he needs. He also doesn't need to be working on a farm - if he is being worked through obedience and other daily training exercises. Daily exercise and regular training can be done with a rottweiler who lives in a NYC apartment!

    Has this dog had any kind of regular training? Why doesn't your father want him neutered? (I hope it is not because he wants to breed this dog. This would only bring more irresponsibly bred rottweilers into the world, and animal shelters are full of dogs from these types of breedings. There is SO much more to responsible breeding.)
    Sylvia
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