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Hi new here

It's just me and my sister who has autism and were struggling to find the right breed for us. I will put below what we're looking for in a dog.

So we were looking at German shepherds as we thought they were right for us but we have been told they aren't as there too vocal and known to be gobby, Jen doesn't like a lot of barking or high pitched noises due to her autism so we were told get a Labrador or Golden retriever but there too friendly with strangers and get a lot of attention from others which will make Jen feel uncomfortable so then Golden and lab owners say get a GSD but then we're back to the vocal issue.
We then spoke to a Dog behaviourist and trainer who also trains dogs for autistic children and adults and she recommended a Rottweiler as there less vocal and calmer than GSD and people avoid them.

After lots of reading we do really like the Rottweiler and just wanted to get advice from owners

We are looking for (based on an adult dog we know puppy's are crazy)

an easy to train dog ( were both new to dogs)

laid back

a dog whose friendly with other pets ( has to be good with cats)

Ok with other dogs is either friendly or just ignores them

not yappy we live in a semi detached house and our neighbours are the type who would complain and we dont want to upset or annoy them so more of a quiet breed and jen hates a lot of barking or high pitch noises

a dog who loves exercise as we love long walks

a calm dog ( jen gets uncomfortable around hyper dogs like springers due to her autism she does better around calm dogs)

Easy coat care we dont mind brushing and bathing but we could not handle a huge grooming job.

Not interested in going upto strangers only wants to be with his people.

Large size no smaller than a golden no giants.

We can provide plenty of mental stimulation and I don't mind getting into dog sports to give the dog something to do.

We with be using a professional from day one of the pup coming home to help us and are fully aware after meeting the breed how powerful they are and they can be strong minded.
 

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If you don't mind me asking what age is your sister and how challenging is her autism? You mentioned being new to dogs so a Rottweiler might be a bit of a challenge.

I have 2 autistic kids who have their challenges but attend mainstream school and are pretty high functioning - they absolutely love Vader and are really good at managing him and letting him know he's bottom of the pecking order.

All puppies of any breed are going to be pretty hyper with lots of biting and jumping until they learn.

How long is a long walk? If you are not biking or running I'm sure most dogs could cope with this.

Our last dog was a big greyhound which might fit your needs pretty perfectly, we have 5 cats and he lived with them with no issues. Rescuing one that used to race could be tricky with cats though but they are brilliant dogs.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I don't mind, she's 24yrs and I'm 26yrs , according to our GP she's mild autistic.

She understands that all puppies are bitey and jumpy and is fine with that it's if they stay like that as adults for example Springer spaniels make her uncomfortable because all of the ones we have been around have been all over the place.

Jen can also be picky and the thinner build of greyhounds are not to her liking.

We fully understand that they are a powerful breed and are challenging but we are committed and will be prepared to put the time and effort into training and careful socialization.
 

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I'm not sure a Rottweiler will be a good fit in your home?? Yes, Rottweilers are less barky than German Shepherds. They usually only bark when there is a reason. They don't always get along with other dogs...and depending on their prey drive may go after cats in the house. They are not a good breed for a first time dog owner. They need training and lots of it...but probably the most important thing is they need a leader. They need to know that people are in charge, and are consistent with the rules, or they may one day decide they want to be in charge.

If you have a chance of fostering an adult Rottweiler, or if there is a rescue in the area that screens their dogs well and have them living with fosters that may be the best way to start.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thank you, I have read black dogs get less attention from people in general and we were also recommend to go for a Black lab. Do any of you know if this is true? I've been told black dogs are harder to re-home
 

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Thank you, I have read black dogs get less attention from people in general and we were also recommend to go for a Black lab. Do any of you know if this is true? I've been told black dogs are harder to re-home
try getting a pit bull. They are generally people friendly but not like a lab or golden. Not a hard dog to train and there are plenty of rescues. Big heads and muscular bodies are a strong deterrent to the average passerby.
 

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I saw your post on the GSD forum too. I've had two GSDs, one Beagle, and big old mutt as well as Agis (Rottie mix; got him because he was supposed to be part GSD - I'd eat my hat if that were true).

It's going to very much depend on the individual dog, if I'm honest. My female GSD was quiet - except when she identified a threat (and she had good discernment). She only ever lived in houses, in terms of noise. My male would bark at noises in the hall etc. but was easy going otherwise (and he did learn to generally not do that). My female GSD was extremely challenging. My male GSD was black and people generally avoided both of them, unless they were dog people.

Agis looks like a miniature (54lb) Rottie. People who aren't dog people often will ignore/avoid him, and people with small dogs sometimes do as well too. He is suspicious (and I'd say doesn't have good discernment). We've had him from a puppy, unlike the GSDs. And he's not purebred, so, YMMV.

If your GSD was like my male Luc - I'd say great fit. He was my first dog. He had GSD traits but was relatively easy going. If your GSD was like Teagan - I'd say run. If your Rottie was like Agis - well, he's been a handful, but we've also didn't get him as a fully formed adult. It's been a joy to see him grow up, but it's also been a lot of work, and in a way that's different than an adult dog (in my experience), and in a way that's different from our other mutt, who has more easy going breeds. Agis has turning into a very good dog. But (at risk of sounding like a horrible person), there have been times I could've cheerfully throttled him.

This is a long-winded way of saying it's 100% going to vary on the dog. I personally wouldn't think a Rottie would be a good first time dog, but then, GSD people say that about GSDs and I did that - BUT - I went to a rescue and got an adult with a known temperament and known prey drive (I had various types of small animals at the time).

I would suggest looking into rescues (not shelters) where the dog lives with a family and preferably even cats and they can tell you how it reacts to cats, other dogs it meets, new people - is it aloof? Friendly? That sort of thing.
 

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read agis’s post.

x 2. it is going to depend on the dog, and you two. if you are up to the task, it’ll be a homerun. if you arent, it’ll be a disaster.
 

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I can only comment from the perspective of one Rottweiler: she fits most of your criteria but not all of them. She loves to go up to people. Her coat is a constant battle of care and shedding, and she only became calm in her later years. During her youth she was crazy high energy. If you do end up getting a Rott, I wish you all the luck and happiness.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
After talking with a charity that trains autistic dogs and then talking to Jen this afternoon (were in the UK) we have chosen to go for a Black Labrador as the woman from the autistic charity said labs are the best dog for people with autism they really are in tune with there emotions and are able to tell when the need to adjust the way they are, they also help autistic people grow there confidence too and she feels a lab would be suitable for us she said if Jen really wanted less attention then go for a black one as they tend to get less attention and the ones who fail here as assistant dogs it's always the blacks who get overlooked.

So we have chosen a Black Labrador
 

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After talking with a charity that trains autistic dogs and then talking to Jen this afternoon (were in the UK) we have chosen to go for a Black Labrador as the woman from the autistic charity said labs are the best dog for people with autism they really are in tune with there emotions and are able to tell when the need to adjust the way they are, they also help autistic people grow there confidence too and she feels a lab would be suitable for us she said if Jen really wanted less attention then go for a black one as they tend to get less attention and the ones who fail here as assistant dogs it's always the blacks who get overlooked.

So we have chosen a Black Labrador
Labs really are brilliant dogs, sounds like you guys will absolutely love your new addition when it arrives!
 

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After talking with a charity that trains autistic dogs and then talking to Jen this afternoon (were in the UK) we have chosen to go for a Black Labrador as the woman from the autistic charity said labs are the best dog for people with autism they really are in tune with there emotions and are able to tell when the need to adjust the way they are, they also help autistic people grow there confidence too and she feels a lab would be suitable for us she said if Jen really wanted less attention then go for a black one as they tend to get less attention and the ones who fail here as assistant dogs it's always the blacks who get overlooked.

So we have chosen a Black Labrador
Right decision, for genuine reasons. So exciting for you! Best of luck and I wish you both many years of happiness and fun, with your new edition
 

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After talking with a charity that trains autistic dogs and then talking to Jen this afternoon (were in the UK) we have chosen to go for a Black Labrador as the woman from the autistic charity said labs are the best dog for people with autism they really are in tune with there emotions and are able to tell when the need to adjust the way they are, they also help autistic people grow there confidence too and she feels a lab would be suitable for us she said if Jen really wanted less attention then go for a black one as they tend to get less attention and the ones who fail here as assistant dogs it's always the blacks who get overlooked.

So we have chosen a Black Labrador
a British lab would be a good fit. american bred lab? not so much.
 

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After talking with a charity that trains autistic dogs and then talking to Jen this afternoon (were in the UK) we have chosen to go for a Black Labrador as the woman from the autistic charity said labs are the best dog for people with autism they really are in tune with there emotions and are able to tell when the need to adjust the way they are, they also help autistic people grow there confidence too and she feels a lab would be suitable for us she said if Jen really wanted less attention then go for a black one as they tend to get less attention and the ones who fail here as assistant dogs it's always the blacks who get overlooked.

So we have chosen a Black Labrador
Labs are great dogs. Best wishes.
 
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