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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
well someone told me the other day to watch my boy cause the dog he was playing with has ear mytes .....


well today he started flopping his head side to side......


i felt his ears and they were HOT ....


Donna do dogs get them from other dogs ?????


i found the medacine i had for him when he had them long time ago .... BUT i dont want to just use it if thats not what it is ....


on the other hand i dont want to wait either ... took a long time to clear him up and get him healthy ..... he was a very very sick boy when i got him .... from kennel cough to ear mytes .... just a mess ...
 

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I did find some stuff that I can cut and paste.


Heres the start of it
<H3 align=center>Canine Ear Infection</H3>
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<DIV align=left>As demonstrated by the above illustration, the dog's ear canal has a vertical and a horizontal component. This predisposes the dog to ear infections as debris must work its way upward rather than straight out.
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<DIV align=left>Disease of the ear usually stems from over-production of wax as occurs in response to irritation. Allergic skin disease affecting the ears is one possible cause (especially in recurring cases); other causes of ear infections include ear mites, and foreign bodies (such as grass awns or foxtails), or hair growth deep in the canal (common in poodles and schnauzers especially). The moisture of the wax promotes bacterial growth and infection. Soon wax in ears is joined by pus.
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<DIV align=left>Dogs show discomfort around their ears by scratching, rubbing their ears on the floor or furniture, or by shaking the head. If the infection reaches the middle ear, affected animals may have a head tilt, a lack of balance, and unusual eye movements.</DIV>


AURAL HEMATOMA


When a dog with uncomfortable ears shakes and scratches vigorously, a blood vessel in the ear flap may rupture. This leads to bleeding into the tissues of the pinna (see above illustration). The usual recommendation is to have the blood clots removed and the ear bandaged and cleaned under anesthesia. If the hematoma is not so big as to occlude the ear canal (thus preventing medication), the option to forgo surgery exists; but without surgery, the ear may scar down into an abnormal appearance.


TREATMENT


STEP ONE


Most ear infections are cleared up simply with professional cleaning followed by medication at home. If only mild debris is present in the ear canals, simple disinfection and washing of the ear is adequate; however, in most cases, a full ear flush is needed to even examine the ear drum. For patient comfort, we recommend sedation for this procedure as the ears are sore and the instruments can be damaging if the pet jumps at the wrong time.


STEP TWO


Some dogs have chronic ear problems (the infection is not controlled by general medication or returns when general medication is discontinued). In these cases, the ear discharge should be cultured so that the precise organism can be pinpointed and treated specifically. Regular treatment at home with disinfecting ear washes should become part of the pet's grooming routine.


Further testing may be in order to determine why the infection continues to recur. Allergy is the most common reason for recurrent ear problems.


STEP THREE


Depending on the severity of the problem, the vertical canal may need to be opened surgically. This enables debris to be removed more effectively. This is done to prevent severe scarring after prolonged specific medical therapy has been ineffective.


If the canal becomes so scarred that it is practically closed, "ablation" may be the final option. In this surgical procedure the entire ear canal is removed and healthy tissue is allowed to grow in. These procedures are "last resorts" after severe infection has made effective medical treatment impossible. A specialist is called in for these cases and, although surgery is expensive, dogs with chronic severe otitis usually require no further ear treatment for the rest of their lives.


SOME SPECIAL INFORMATION ON PSEUDOMONAS INFECTION:
Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a very special species of bacteria; it is resistant to almost every possible antibiotic. It is common for ear infections to be recurrent and in time, many antibiotics have been used. The unfortunate tendency is for most bacteria to be killed off, leaving infection with the very resistant and practically immortal (not to mention especially smelly) Pseudomonas.
If one if lucky, a culture of the ear discharge will reveal that the Pseudomonas is still sensitive to oral quinolone antibiotics such as enrofloxacin or orbifloxacin. It should be noted that especially high doses of this type of antibiotic are needed to treat Pseudomonas in the ear and that inadequate dosing will just make Pseudomonas even more resistant. In other words, Pseudomonas must be treated definitively from the moment it is diagnosed; once it becomes resistant to oral therapy, treatment becomes vastly more difficult.
Oral therapy is generally combined with some kind of topical treatment of the ear. Fortunately there are several concoctions that should be useful though some your vet must mix him/herself.
Silvadene/silver sulfadiazine
This product is manufactured as a wound creme and is especially helpful in hastening the healing of damaged external tissues. It also has activity against several bacteria including Pseudomonas. The creme can be prepared in water for an easier ear administration.
Tris-EDTA
EDTA is a binder of metals which are important to the bacterial cell wall. Tris is used to buffer the EDTA to a pH that is not irritating to the ear and to maximize the anti-bacterial effect.
Injectable Medications
It would be unusual for a Pseudomonas species to be resistant to absolutely everything. While there may not be an oral treatment available, sometimes an owner may be taught to give injectable treatments. These are often expensive, however. These same medications can also be mixed up for topical use; many are already available as commercially prepared solutions.
Chronic ear infections, as mentioned, typically have an underlying cause
(usually allergy). It is important to address this problem
in addition to the infection itself so as to minimize on-going ear inflammation.
</LI>
 

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Ear Mites



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<H1 style="MARGIN-BOTTOM: 12pt" ="MsoNormal">Dog And Cat Ear Mites</H1>

It's a problem both cats and dogs experience, and these are the warning signs:

Excessive and persistent scratching around the ears, head shaking, restless behavior; the ears are painful to the touch and the pet may cry out in pain, brown material present in the ears or a foul-smelling odor. <O:p></O:p></TD></TR></T></T></T></TABLE></TD></TR>
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The villains are ear mites, tiny parasites that live on the surface of the skin lining in the ear canal. They pierce the skin surface to feed, causing inflammation and discomfort. If left untreated, bacterial infections and loss of hearing may result.

Puppies can acquire an ear mite infection from their mother. Ear mites can be transmitted from one household pet to another. If ear mites are present in a multiple-pet household or a kennel, it is likely that if one animal is treated, the mites will move to another resident. The best preventive measure is to treat all residents for mites.

Dogs with long, floppy ears are more prone to ear mite infections over short (opened) ear dogs. Air movement is restricted, promoting infection and bacterial growth. When a dog shakes its head excessively, blood vessels may rupture and soft swellings form on the ear flap. This condition is called hematoma and immediate treatment is needed to avoid pain to the dog and possible ear deformity.

If you have an infected pet, follow your veterinarian's advice. Give your pet the entire course of the prescribed ointment or lotion. If you stop a few days short because the problem seems to have gone away, parasites and bacteria may still be present and multiplying, prolonging the infection.

In some instances, bacteria (a secondary infection to mites) may develop resistance to a certain medication. It's a good idea to make follow-up visits to your veterinarian to be sure the infection is cleared up.

Ear mite infestation is often found where flea infestation, ringworm, and viral infections are present. Stress in multiple-animal environments, such as kennels, is associated with this disease. Maintaining strict sanitation procedures and avoiding overcrowded conditions are essential.</CENTER></TD></TR></T></T></T></TABLE>
 

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An easy home remedy to *prevent* ear infections (will not cure an existing one) is:<?:NAMESPACE PREFIX = O /><O:p></O:p><O:p></O:p><O:p></O:p>
2 Tablespoons Boric Acid<O:p>
</O:p> 4 oz Rubbing Alcohol<O:p>
</O:p> 1 Tablespoon Glycerin<O:p></O:p><O:p></O:p><O:p></O:p>
Shake well. Put 1 small eyedropper full in each ear. Rub it around first, and then let the dog shake. Do this once a week and you shouldn't see any ear infections. It works by raising the pH level slightly inside the ear, making it less hospitable to bacteria.<O:p></O:p><O:p></O:p><O:p></O:p><O:p></O:p><O:p>
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To clean out an ear that's simply dirty (some buildup of dirt and wax is normal, but excessive ear wax may indicate that something else is wrong), take a cotton ball, dip in hydrogen peroxide if you like (squeeze excess out) and wipe the dog's ear out. The canal is rather deep, so you will not injure your dog so long as you only use your finger to probe the canal. Clean all around the little crevices as best as you can. Use another cotton ball for the other ear. Be sure to dry the ears out thoroughly.<O:p></O:p><O:p></O:p>
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
WELL ,


lets see .... i got his ears cleaned up .....


i dont know if i did it right though ....


i mean NOW he HEARS me .... but he DON'T LISTEN to me .... LOL


but yes thanks to stephenie ..... i love the color of this stuff too ...
 
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