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Hello,
I have a 9-10 week old rottweiler male puppy. He weighs 19 lbs. He is fairly active and plays with my Doberman a lot. Also participates well in training and exercise, walks, etc. However, I'm a little concerned about the shape of his legs. I'm not sure if he is exhibiting signs for elbow dysplasia. I do think that his feet are slightly oriented in opposite directions and since he is so young, I'm concerned this condition might worsen in the coming weeks. Can someone please let me know if his feet are normal and healthy or whether these are indeed signs of elbow dysplasia?

Please see attached pictures.....
 

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You need to get a picture of him standing up on all 4 feet...a side view and a front view. Elbow dysplasia starts with limping. Your pup looks from the first picture that he may be a bit "east/west". That's what they call it when the feet are turning out a bit. This can be caused by diet ,and or just the way they are growing. What are you feeding him?

What is his background? Does he come from sire and dam that have hip and elbow certs? If he were my pup...I would make sure that he is eating a high quality large breed pup diet...and not overfed. I would also probably be careful of playing too much with your Doberman, and try not to over exercise him with walks, and forced exercise. His bones are young and growing....too much exercise is not good. Pups often don't know when they've had enough....and can overdo it and damage can be done. He's young, and he's growing...and sometimes you just need to crate them to rest.
 

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You need to get a picture of him standing up on all 4 feet...a side view and a front view. Elbow dysplasia starts with limping. Your pup looks from the first picture that he may be a bit "east/west". That's what they call it when the feet are turning out a bit. This can be caused by diet ,and or just the way they are growing. What are you feeding him?

What is his background? Does he come from sire and dam that have hip and elbow certs? If he were my pup...I would make sure that he is eating a high quality large breed pup diet...and not overfed. I would also probably be careful of playing too much with your Doberman, and try not to over exercise him with walks, and forced exercise. His bones are young and growing....too much exercise is not good. Pups often don't know when they've had enough....and can overdo it and damage can be done. He's young, and he's growing...and sometimes you just need to crate them to rest.

I apologize for the late reply. I feed him Farmina N&D Maxi Puppy (Lamb and Pumpkin version) 300gm/day and sometimes, chicken and some veggies. I don't have information about the sire and dam's elbow certs. I have attached front and side pictures as you asked. Please see attached. I was concerned that too much time on the marble floor in my house was one of the reasons for his feet turning outwards because he usually spreads his legs on them as if he is slipping a little. I have now confined him to the rougher surfaces in our yard and outside play areas and I have seen a little difference. However, I do think from the front and side pictures that his feet are in fact turning outward. Is there a fix to this? If so, what should I do? I am providing him a well balanced diet and also supplementing his food with calcium, phosphorus and fish oil supplements.
I appreciate your advice...
 

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Also, I've never seen him limp or in pain. He is always cheerful and even jumps and runs around. No pain even if I touch the joints or legs, etc.
 

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Honestly, I don't think his feet are too bad. I agree with you, that standing and walking on slippery marble floors are not great for a growing puppy. Some people that have slippery floors put down cheap runner mats for their pups/dogs to walk on. I would allow him in the house...that is the best place for him to be with his people...just put down some runners so he does not slip while walking in the house.
I would stop adding calcium! Too much calcium can cause more problems then east/west feet. The food he is eating is balanced and has all of the nutrition he needs right now...adding a few extras once in awhile will not harm him...but not too much.

I would add some vitamin C to his diet...you cannot give too much...it will go out with his urine. Start with small amounts...because it can cause tummy upsets if too much is given at once. The best is to get Ester-C. Start with 500 mgs...and go up slowly in the next 2 weeks. People that have Great Danes and other large breeds swear by Ester-C helping with east/west feet and other bone growth problems.
 

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Also, I've never seen him limp or in pain. He is always cheerful and even jumps and runs around. No pain even if I touch the joints or legs, etc.
Oh that's good. Honestly, if he had elbow dysplasia...you would know. He would be in pain, and limping. I think you have solved his problem...slippery floors.
 

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Honestly, I don't think his feet are too bad. I agree with you, that standing and walking on slippery marble floors are not great for a growing puppy. Some people that have slippery floors put down cheap runner mats for their pups/dogs to walk on. I would allow him in the house...that is the best place for him to be with his people...just put down some runners so he does not slip while walking in the house.
I would stop adding calcium! Too much calcium can cause more problems then east/west feet. The food he is eating is balanced and has all of the nutrition he needs right now...adding a few extras once in awhile will not harm him...but not too much.

I would add some vitamin C to his diet...you cannot give too much...it will go out with his urine. Start with small amounts...because it can cause tummy upsets if too much is given at once. The best is to get Ester-C. Start with 500 mgs...and go up slowly in the next 2 weeks. People that have Great Danes and other large breeds swear by Ester-C helping with east/west feet and other bone growth problems.


Thanks for the advice! I will get him started on vitamin C right away.
 
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