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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I want to preface this by saying we are NOWHERE NEAR READY to get another dog. However this is something that my husband and I discuss often given the issues that Norton has. Our female hound mix is 9. She’s got plenty of years left but with Norton having the dog issues he has we often discuss what it will look like when our female is gone and we want another dog and if that’s even possible. Now Norton hates all other dogs. He liked the neighbors dog the very first time they met them after that he decided he hated him. He LOVES our female. His world revolves around her. I worry to that he will be severally depressed when she goes.

So I wonder. How do we integrate a puppy into our family after our female is gone? Is it even possible? He met a puppy once and thought it was great. Could that be the answer? We’d love to have a Newfoundland. My husband and I have both always admired the breed.

Am I totally off base thinking a puppy would be less threatening? Would he know it’s a puppy? Will it matter that WE bring the puppy into the home. I am out of my depth on this one. I have so many questions and no real way to test them or find answers. Norton will be older so will that matter? I’d love to try and get him in a neutral environment to see if he could be around a strange dog but I don’t think he’s there yet. I dont know if he ever will be.

Does anyone have thoughts or advice?
 

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Most dogs will accept a puppy if you do things right. It would have to be a female pup...and for the breeder to pick a pup from the litter that is not pushy or dominant. A more laid-back pup would be the best for Norton. I would then have pup in a crate and let Norton smell the pup so he knows that the pup is here. The allow him to have supervised visits with the pup while he is on leash and can be corrected . If he starts getting too rough or too interested, puppy is put away. If you don't push things too hard at the beginning and taking it slow....things should be ok.
 

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BBD has it, I think.

My female GSD was hugely aggressive with strange dogs. I brought her into a home with my male GSD, and they got along fine. She was more dominant, and he followed her lead.

When I adopted Neb as a puppy, the rescue separated him from his mom around 6 weeks (don't ask, ugh) and so when I brought him home he was small. I had him in a crate and let her come out and smell him. She spent a day lying in front of the crate just gazing at him, so I thought, I'll let him out (I hadn't planned to let them interact for around a week). Neb climbed up on Teagan's head, bit her ear and fell off dangling from her ear. She was thrilled. I'd never seen her so happy.

Norton may not be like that, but introducing a puppy may go better than you think. I think having Norton on leash is a good idea and one I should've done.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thank you both for your replies. BBD that’s how I figured we would have to work it. Very slow controlled interactions until Norton accepts the puppy. I’m glad to hear that puppies are more accepted that’s a relief. 😊 Agis I’m not sure if he’d be as quickly accepting as your Teagan but that’s adorable and I can only hope it will go that well for us when the time comes.
 

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Yes been said above
A pup is better than an older dog/bitch and by older i mean 6months plus. Laid back female is your best bet definatley. Lots of supervision/work ongoing will be needed, more so because of his attitude towards other dogs. If you can put in the work and pitentially ongoing patience then should be fine. Id say alot can change in a year, let alone several, so id say re assess when its time too and if you still are geared up for it, then go for it
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Yes been said above
A pup is better than an older dog/bitch and by older i mean 6months plus. Laid back female is your best bet definatley. Lots of supervision/work ongoing will be needed, more so because of his attitude towards other dogs. If you can put in the work and pitentially ongoing patience then should be fine. Id say alot can change in a year, let alone several, so id say re assess when its time too and if you still are geared up for it, then go for it
Lol putting the work in will not be an issue. We work hard with him everyday. As exhausting and frustrating as his issues can get he’s worth it. I have zero illusions about bringing a new puppy in being a breeze. I full expect this to be a process and lots of work. And I do believe there is a lot of potential for him to continue to improve and be in a better spot several years down the road. The leaps and bounds he’s made since we brought him home continue to give me hope. And I would without a doubt lean toward a laid back personality with a puppy that’s going to one day weigh more than me.
 

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I want to preface this by saying we are NOWHERE NEAR READY to get another dog. However this is something that my husband and I discuss often given the issues that Norton has. Our female hound mix is 9. She’s got plenty of years left but with Norton having the dog issues he has we often discuss what it will look like when our female is gone and we want another dog and if that’s even possible. Now Norton hates all other dogs. He liked the neighbors dog the very first time they met them after that he decided he hated him. He LOVES our female. His world revolves around her. I worry to that he will be severally depressed when she goes.

So I wonder. How do we integrate a puppy into our family after our female is gone? Is it even possible? He met a puppy once and thought it was great. Could that be the answer? We’d love to have a Newfoundland. My husband and I have both always admired the breed.

Am I totally off base thinking a puppy would be less threatening? Would he know it’s a puppy? Will it matter that WE bring the puppy into the home. I am out of my depth on this one. I have so many questions and no real way to test them or find answers. Norton will be older so will that matter? I’d love to try and get him in a neutral environment to see if he could be around a strange dog but I don’t think he’s there yet. I dont know if he ever will be.

Does anyone have thoughts or advice?
I have a 5 year old male German Shepard mix. I brought a puppy Rottweiler also male into our mix this past April. My big guy didn't acknowledge him, and basically avoided him. Fast forward to August as the pup hit adolescence, sheww... They don't like each other one bit! Buy I hired a trainer, and what I say goes. They don't have to like each other but they have to follow my rules! Once I put my foot down and used the tools provided with consistency, they still don't like one another but they are civil.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I have a 5 year old male German Shepard mix. I brought a puppy Rottweiler also male into our mix this past April. My big guy didn't acknowledge him, and basically avoided him. Fast forward to August as the pup hit adolescence, sheww... They don't like each other one bit! Buy I hired a trainer, and what I say goes. They don't have to like each other but they have to follow my rules! Once I put my foot down and used the tools provided with consistency, they still don't like one another but they are civil.
Thant you for your reply. Norton has a very serious dog aggression issues combined with a very low confidence level. We adopted him at 9 months with no idea what his puppyhood was like. We have take him to a professional trainer and continue to work with him. We use NILIF and the command chain is very clear in our house. Norton knows very clearly who is in charge in our house. The only dog he doesn’t want to attack is our female hound mix. She is about six years older than him and he LOVES her. He has made huge steps and improvements with his aggression and confidence issues but he will never be a dog I would consider even remotely dog friendly. His issues aren’t a question of leadership or training. I hope one day he will be better- to the level we can pass a dog on the opposite side of the street without him reacting. I would never get a male pup with Norton in the house. Our next puppy will be a female.
 

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You're welcome! I did forget to mention that my Rottie puppy was extremely aggressive. He was almost 8 weeks when I brought him home. He was the cutest little fuzzy bear with the attitude of a piranha! The breeder told me that all of the pups were pretty cranky. She had a litter of 9 pups 6 passed away. My Pup was one of the 3 survivors, they were ill, and she had to administer antibiotics and take extra care of them and mama dog. I took him to the vet to see if he had a medical condition causing his behavior. Vet saw nothing wrong. I sent him to training for 3 weeks "board and train" as soon as he was fully vaccinated. He came back for the better! Rotties can be bossy, even at a young age. I have to keep up on his group training, as he tries to push the limits. I can take him anywhere though. 😌 I am so proud of him when he can walk past and ignore other dogs. I took him to Scheels this past weekend and another dog barked at him causing him to growl. I immediately corrected him and he proceeded on without incident. He's not fond of other dogs either, but just as I am in charge at home, it carries on to wherever else we may be. My 5yr old dog is the only dog that he has tangled with since he is opportunistic. I took him to get his CGC at 6 months of age, he passed but even with that I have to be on top of his every move in public. He's 8 months/ 90lbs now and I have noticed that he is getting pushier and testing me more. Keep up with the training, it is so worth it! I get looks of fear because of his size and appearance that turn into confusion because he is well behaved. Good luck! You're already doing good with him!
 
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