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Hi All , I’m new here. I have a ten month old Rottweiler who has been diagnosed via the vets with severe hip dysplasia. I’m not sure what I’m asking. I just as very sad. He is a beautiful full of energy rotty. I noticed at eight months old he all of a sudden went so lame on his hind legs whilst getting up from lying down. Other than the lameness then you wouldn’t know hes an energetic as every. Anyone else any advice? He is taking joint supplements, we are starting hydrotherapy monthly, painkillers from the vets and possible surgery but they will not look into that until he has grown. Also he was hip scored (parents) and from a legitimate breeder. I have told them.
many thanks, Emily
Dog Jaw Collar Whiskers Dog breed
 

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Welcome to the forums! I'm so sorry to hear about your pup. Getting a hip dysplasia diagnosis is heart breaking. The good news is that it sounds like you are doing everything right. How much does he weigh right now? Try to keep him slim and trim and not gaining weight quickly...so that his joints and ligaments have a chance to grow slowly with him. His hips may get better after most of his growth is finished. They may not get better...but they may not get worse. Always look at the dog you have in front of you...not his x-rays. I've seen dogs that had not really terrible hips have difficulty with simple walks, and I've seen dogs with terrible hips run and jump and move....and you would never know they had hip problems. I would try to curtail any really strenuous activities (chasing after a ball, catching a Frisbee, long walks,etc.) Most often when the dog does too much ....they pay for it later on trying to get up after laying down.

Try to do more mental activities...puzzle games, scent games, a raw marrow bone to chew....things that he can do without running or jumping. Let us know how he is doing.
 
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Welcome to the forums! I'm so sorry to hear about your pup. Getting a hip dysplasia diagnosis is heart breaking. The good news is that it sounds like you are doing everything right. How much does he weigh right now? Try to keep him slim and trim and not gaining weight quickly...so that his joints and ligaments have a chance to grow slowly with him. His hips may get better after most of his growth is finished. They may not get better...but they may not get worse. Always look at the dog you have in front of you...not his x-rays. I've seen dogs that had not really terrible hips have difficulty with simple walks, and I've seen dogs with terrible hips run and jump and move....and you would never know they had hip problems. I would try to curtail any really strenuous activities (chasing after a ball, catching a Frisbee, long walks,etc.) Most often when the dog does too much ....they pay for it later on trying to get up after laying down.

Try to do more mental activities...puzzle games, scent games, a raw marrow bone to chew....things that he can do without running or jumping. Let us know how he is doing.
thankyou. Yes he isn’t allowed off lead and trying to keep calm but wow it’s hard as he’s bouncy and a big pup bless him.
right now he’s 37kg and nearly eleven months old he seems lean and healthy?
you are right he does pay for it later if too much walking so myself and I have a dog Walker when I work only take him for twenty mins.
the breeders didn’t want to know when I told them. Luckily I have insurance.
 

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My heart just melted. What a sweet face.

I'm so sorry about the HD diagnosis. I adopted a female German Shepherd who ended up being diagnosed and we did similar (supplements, pain meds, and swimming at a dog pool (Canada in the winter!).
 

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My heart just melted. What a sweet face.

I'm so sorry about the HD diagnosis. I adopted a female German Shepherd who ended up being diagnosed and we did similar (supplements, pain meds, and swimming at a dog pool (Canada in the winter!).
Thankyou, it’s hard isn’t it. I have two children and he is fantastic with them and I’ve put a lot of training into him already. Luckily the vet said there is always something that can be done to help him but it’s severe. I shall do my best. Vet said his life can be managed and surgery when he may need it. Xx
 

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Hi,
I'm sorry to hear about Denzel. He's adorable! We had a dog named Zeus who had a hip replaced at 7 y.o. and after replacement, he was like a new dog, just with crazy energy. We had to keep him confined for a month (I think it was a month) and he literally destroyed a room bouncing off the walls. After the surgery he was completely fine. So, when the time comes to replace Denzel's hip and he grows up enough, I know it's an expensive surgery, but well worth it, you get a 100% healthy happy dog out of it. We had our surgery done at a vet hospital (U.C. Davis) flew there and drove him back. A vet hospital is a great way to go because the teacher does the surgery, a vet who has done the surgery countless times and the students just watch. The students also look after the dog after surgery so it's a really optimum situation if you have a vet hospital within a decent radius of where you live.
 

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My boy was recently diagnosed with HD also. We were told he needs a total hip replacement. He is a bit older at 3yrs but still very young. We currently have him on a pain regimen and joint supplements. He is well managed. We keep him at a lean but healthy weight and mange his activity. He is doing well. He has some restrictions naturally and we can tell when he over does it as he’s sore for a bit and moves slower.
 
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