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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello all,

The title of my post should hopefully be self explanatory, and I've found forums like these are filled with people who LOVE their breed of dog and only want the best for all other dogs, so I believe this is the best place to ask. I apologize for the inevitable length of this post but hope you will all understand after I've shared a bit about myself/situation and you can all have an informed response to my question. I will try to make this as to the point as possible.

I am married and have no children, but have two nieces (a third on the way) and a nephew whom I love dearly, all under the age of 5. They visit for blocks of time as those children cover both my and my wife sides of the family and everyone lives in a different state, so when they visit us or we visit them, it is for at least a week, usually two. I have had two dogs in my life that I am old enough to have cared for, one female boxer named Jayda who was the absolute best dog ever. I know everyone says that but she really was. We got her when I was 17 and as the siblings and I all moved out, mom kept her and we took turns bringing her to our places on weekends. She was amazing and energetic as could be all the way until we had to put her down at 10 years old due to cancer. The second dog was a dog I'd dreamed of owning my whole life, a male Great Dane named Jameson. I fell in love with Great Danes when I saw one for the first time and knew I'd own one one day. My wife and I purchased one from a breeder. At the time we lived in a condo, and we both worked full time. Every morning I'd take Jameson for a walk, and we paid for a dog walker mid day to take him out for a half hour. My wife usually got home before I did and would take him out again, and then I'd take him out a fourth time to play fetch in the barn that adjoined our condo complex (the HOA owned the barn so we had access to the horse run). Jameson was a biter. Not puppy biting or teething biting, he was that too, but I knew we had a problem when while walking him one day he tried to bite the leash (a bad habit that we had been working on extensively with trainers) and when I pulled the leash away from him and said no, he bit my leg. After consulting with multiple other Dane owners and trainers, I was warned that this was going to be a potential problem, and the fact that he made a second attempt to bite me and it wasn't just his reaction or a slip in taking the leash away from him was cause for concern. We took Jameson to four different trainers, spent countless hours with him training on a daily basis, did muzzle training and a number of other training methods, but the biting did not stop. It definitely was getting better but it never stopped, specifically with me. We were determined that we could fix the issue, but the final straw came when my niece visited us who at the time was 3 1/2. My wife took Jameson for a walk with my niece and kept them on opposite sides of her. At some point while Jameson was using the bathroom, my niece walked ahead of my wife, and as Jameson finished up and they began to catch up to my niece, he lunged at her, knocking her face down to the ground, and lunged again after she hit the floor. Thankfully my wife was strong enough to pull him away after the initial knock down, but the psychological damage had been done. My niece ran in to the house and got me (I had been BBQing for dinner) and told me my wife needed help with the dog. I ran out to see Jameson literally jumping at my wifes face trying to bite her. I ran over and took the leash from her and finished Jamesons walk, who remained on a 1 foot leash for the rest of our walk (still trying to bite me throughout). After that it was decided that we could no longer have Jameson in our home, and we found a couple that was willing to take him that lived on a one acre property and he was rehomed.

It has been approximately three years since we rehomed Jameson. Our current living situation has changed, we now own a home with a big yard, and my wife is getting the itch to have a dog again. I am much more hesitant, the experience with Jameson was really bad for me because I was generally the target of the biting, so I'm admittedly less of a dog lover than I had been before, but I truly think that is because of the very bad experience. We are active people who live in the midwest and enjoy hiking and my wife loves running. Any dog we had would be an inside dog with outside access as it does get cold here and we would never leave a dog outside in the cold, maybe I would with a huskie I'm not sure, but we're here to talk Rottweilers.

If you believe I'm an awful human for rehoming Jameson, you wouldn't be the first and you likely aren't the last. I just ask you to trust me when I tell you we genuinely tried everything we could. The rehoming decision was not an easy one, but I do not regret it. The safety of my nieces and nephew was in my opinion, at risk when they visited and I would not hesitate to make the same decision again. If we get a Rottweiler or any dog for that matter, I am just as dedicated if not more so than ever before, to get that dog proper training and to do everything in my abilities to continue that training to the best of my ability.

So tell me, is a Rottweiler right for me?
 

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What does your day to day look like if you had a dog? Exercise, training...what do you have time for?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
What does your day to day look like if you had a dog? Exercise, training...what do you have time for?
Well now that things are opening back up I’ll likely be back in the office three days a week and two days from home for 8 hours starting in August. My wife works part time. We hike every weekend and my wife runs at least three days a week during the week. We also live right in front of a park, and our neighbors that have dogs often play fetch with their dogs in the big field by the park. We also live 15 minutes from a state park with trails to walk and a dog park. I believe keeping the dog active will be fairly easy and wouldn’t really be a chore, it’s just an extra buddy to do these things with.
 

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Welcome to the forums! Glad you are doing some research before diving in.
I would get you to read this thread :Rottweilersonline
and this one to start :Rottweiler advice There is some information in these posts that may help you.

What attracts you to the Rottweiler breed? Do you want a friendly, go everywhere, go to the park dog?? This is usually not the case with Rottweilers.

Having a Boxer has given you some experience...both breeds can be similar. Rottweilers do love their family...and close friends of the family...but they can be too protective. Our last Rottweiler (Jemma) was 4 years old when our first grandchild was born, and 6 when the second one came along. She had not grown up with kids...and I would consider her a typical well bred Rottweiler...that was suspicious of people (till she knew them). She LOVED our grandkids and was always gentle with them. Problems can arise when they love their kids, but when a neighbors kids come over...and the dog will not except them.

Sorry to hear about your Great Dane...it does not sound like your dog was a typical GD. I would suspect he may not have been well bred? He should have been returned to the breeder right away when he started biting you. Did you ever follow up with the people that you gave him away to? Did they have biting problems??

I do love the breed and have owned them now for almost 25 years....but I honestly would not recommend them as a breed for most people. It really depends on so many things...you need to find a good breeder, and be willing to put in at least 2 years of formal training into a pup...and then keep up the training.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Welcome to the forums! Glad you are doing some research before diving in.
I would get you to read this thread :Rottweilersonline
and this one to start :Rottweiler advice There is some information in these posts that may help you.

What attracts you to the Rottweiler breed? Do you want a friendly, go everywhere, go to the park dog?? This is usually not the case with Rottweilers.

Having a Boxer has given you some experience...both breeds can be similar. Rottweilers do love their family...and close friends of the family...but they can be too protective. Our last Rottweiler (Jemma) was 4 years old when our first grandchild was born, and 6 when the second one came along. She had not grown up with kids...and I would consider her a typical well bred Rottweiler...that was suspicious of people (till she knew them). She LOVED our grandkids and was always gentle with them. Problems can arise when they love their kids, but when a neighbors kids come over...and the dog will not except them.

Sorry to hear about your Great Dane...it does not sound like your dog was a typical GD. I would suspect he may not have been well bred? He should have been returned to the breeder right away when he started biting you. Did you ever follow up with the people that you gave him away to? Did they have biting problems??

I do love the breed and have owned them now for almost 25 years....but I honestly would not recommend them as a breed for most people. It really depends on so many things...you need to find a good breeder, and be willing to put in at least 2 years of formal training into a pup...and then keep up the training.
This is great info, thank you so much! I'm going to start reading both as soon as I wrap up this reply. I don't necessarily want a dog that loves everyone. Our boxer Jayda loved literally everyone to a fault. A year or two after we got her some high school friends of mine TP'd my car like bored teenagers are known to do and she didn't make a peep. But, we never had to worry about her being aggressive with people and now that I have had to worry about that I know what a relief it actually is. There aren't many children in our lives outside of our nieces and nephew. A few friends have older children but that's about it.

I tend to also think Jameson wasn't a typical Dane. I've met many, and he was the only one that had his, lets call it attitude. We rehomed him to friends of a friend of a friend so never kept up with them between the long string of who knows who. I've tried to reach out to them through social media but haven't received a response which worries me, but it certainly wasn't for lack of trying.

As far as what attracts us to Rottweilers, my best friend in grade school had one that I loved named Matilda. She was very sweet but very protective of my friend and his sister. My wife wants a dog that she can take running the hills with her and I like the idea of a protective dog being with my wife when I am not. I also have concerns though of any dog we get lunging at every dog we see on a trail since that was an issue with Jameson. Thank you again for the reading material and thoughts, I'm going to get started now!
 

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Hello all,

The title of my post should hopefully be self explanatory, and I've found forums like these are filled with people who LOVE their breed of dog and only want the best for all other dogs, so I believe this is the best place to ask. I apologize for the inevitable length of this post but hope you will all understand after I've shared a bit about myself/situation and you can all have an informed response to my question. I will try to make this as to the point as possible.

I am married and have no children, but have two nieces (a third on the way) and a nephew whom I love dearly, all under the age of 5. They visit for blocks of time as those children cover both my and my wife sides of the family and everyone lives in a different state, so when they visit us or we visit them, it is for at least a week, usually two. I have had two dogs in my life that I am old enough to have cared for, one female boxer named Jayda who was the absolute best dog ever. I know everyone says that but she really was. We got her when I was 17 and as the siblings and I all moved out, mom kept her and we took turns bringing her to our places on weekends. She was amazing and energetic as could be all the way until we had to put her down at 10 years old due to cancer. The second dog was a dog I'd dreamed of owning my whole life, a male Great Dane named Jameson. I fell in love with Great Danes when I saw one for the first time and knew I'd own one one day. My wife and I purchased one from a breeder. At the time we lived in a condo, and we both worked full time. Every morning I'd take Jameson for a walk, and we paid for a dog walker mid day to take him out for a half hour. My wife usually got home before I did and would take him out again, and then I'd take him out a fourth time to play fetch in the barn that adjoined our condo complex (the HOA owned the barn so we had access to the horse run). Jameson was a biter. Not puppy biting or teething biting, he was that too, but I knew we had a problem when while walking him one day he tried to bite the leash (a bad habit that we had been working on extensively with trainers) and when I pulled the leash away from him and said no, he bit my leg. After consulting with multiple other Dane owners and trainers, I was warned that this was going to be a potential problem, and the fact that he made a second attempt to bite me and it wasn't just his reaction or a slip in taking the leash away from him was cause for concern. We took Jameson to four different trainers, spent countless hours with him training on a daily basis, did muzzle training and a number of other training methods, but the biting did not stop. It definitely was getting better but it never stopped, specifically with me. We were determined that we could fix the issue, but the final straw came when my niece visited us who at the time was 3 1/2. My wife took Jameson for a walk with my niece and kept them on opposite sides of her. At some point while Jameson was using the bathroom, my niece walked ahead of my wife, and as Jameson finished up and they began to catch up to my niece, he lunged at her, knocking her face down to the ground, and lunged again after she hit the floor. Thankfully my wife was strong enough to pull him away after the initial knock down, but the psychological damage had been done. My niece ran in to the house and got me (I had been BBQing for dinner) and told me my wife needed help with the dog. I ran out to see Jameson literally jumping at my wifes face trying to bite her. I ran over and took the leash from her and finished Jamesons walk, who remained on a 1 foot leash for the rest of our walk (still trying to bite me throughout). After that it was decided that we could no longer have Jameson in our home, and we found a couple that was willing to take him that lived on a one acre property and he was rehomed.

It has been approximately three years since we rehomed Jameson. Our current living situation has changed, we now own a home with a big yard, and my wife is getting the itch to have a dog again. I am much more hesitant, the experience with Jameson was really bad for me because I was generally the target of the biting, so I'm admittedly less of a dog lover than I had been before, but I truly think that is because of the very bad experience. We are active people who live in the midwest and enjoy hiking and my wife loves running. Any dog we had would be an inside dog with outside access as it does get cold here and we would never leave a dog outside in the cold, maybe I would with a huskie I'm not sure, but we're here to talk Rottweilers.

If you believe I'm an awful human for rehoming Jameson, you wouldn't be the first and you likely aren't the last. I just ask you to trust me when I tell you we genuinely tried everything we could. The rehoming decision was not an easy one, but I do not regret it. The safety of my nieces and nephew was in my opinion, at risk when they visited and I would not hesitate to make the same decision again. If we get a Rottweiler or any dog for that matter, I am just as dedicated if not more so than ever before, to get that dog proper training and to do everything in my abilities to continue that training to the best of my ability.

So tell me, is a Rottweiler right for me?
Unless you’re willing to spend an extraordinary amount of time with the dog, don’t get a Rottweiler. Assuming you’re not skilled in the training arena, unless you’re willing to spend the cash and time to have the dog professionally trained, don’t get a Rottweiler.
It comes down to an exceptionally-well bred dog who you socialize and spend a ton of time with.
If you have doubts about any of this, get another breed
 

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Hello all,

The title of my post should hopefully be self explanatory, and I've found forums like these are filled with people who LOVE their breed of dog and only want the best for all other dogs, so I believe this is the best place to ask. I apologize for the inevitable length of this post but hope you will all understand after I've shared a bit about myself/situation and you can all have an informed response to my question. I will try to make this as to the point as possible.

I am married and have no children, but have two nieces (a third on the way) and a nephew whom I love dearly, all under the age of 5. They visit for blocks of time as those children cover both my and my wife sides of the family and everyone lives in a different state, so when they visit us or we visit them, it is for at least a week, usually two. I have had two dogs in my life that I am old enough to have cared for, one female boxer named Jayda who was the absolute best dog ever. I know everyone says that but she really was. We got her when I was 17 and as the siblings and I all moved out, mom kept her and we took turns bringing her to our places on weekends. She was amazing and energetic as could be all the way until we had to put her down at 10 years old due to cancer. The second dog was a dog I'd dreamed of owning my whole life, a male Great Dane named Jameson. I fell in love with Great Danes when I saw one for the first time and knew I'd own one one day. My wife and I purchased one from a breeder. At the time we lived in a condo, and we both worked full time. Every morning I'd take Jameson for a walk, and we paid for a dog walker mid day to take him out for a half hour. My wife usually got home before I did and would take him out again, and then I'd take him out a fourth time to play fetch in the barn that adjoined our condo complex (the HOA owned the barn so we had access to the horse run). Jameson was a biter. Not puppy biting or teething biting, he was that too, but I knew we had a problem when while walking him one day he tried to bite the leash (a bad habit that we had been working on extensively with trainers) and when I pulled the leash away from him and said no, he bit my leg. After consulting with multiple other Dane owners and trainers, I was warned that this was going to be a potential problem, and the fact that he made a second attempt to bite me and it wasn't just his reaction or a slip in taking the leash away from him was cause for concern. We took Jameson to four different trainers, spent countless hours with him training on a daily basis, did muzzle training and a number of other training methods, but the biting did not stop. It definitely was getting better but it never stopped, specifically with me. We were determined that we could fix the issue, but the final straw came when my niece visited us who at the time was 3 1/2. My wife took Jameson for a walk with my niece and kept them on opposite sides of her. At some point while Jameson was using the bathroom, my niece walked ahead of my wife, and as Jameson finished up and they began to catch up to my niece, he lunged at her, knocking her face down to the ground, and lunged again after she hit the floor. Thankfully my wife was strong enough to pull him away after the initial knock down, but the psychological damage had been done. My niece ran in to the house and got me (I had been BBQing for dinner) and told me my wife needed help with the dog. I ran out to see Jameson literally jumping at my wifes face trying to bite her. I ran over and took the leash from her and finished Jamesons walk, who remained on a 1 foot leash for the rest of our walk (still trying to bite me throughout). After that it was decided that we could no longer have Jameson in our home, and we found a couple that was willing to take him that lived on a one acre property and he was rehomed.

It has been approximately three years since we rehomed Jameson. Our current living situation has changed, we now own a home with a big yard, and my wife is getting the itch to have a dog again. I am much more hesitant, the experience with Jameson was really bad for me because I was generally the target of the biting, so I'm admittedly less of a dog lover than I had been before, but I truly think that is because of the very bad experience. We are active people who live in the midwest and enjoy hiking and my wife loves running. Any dog we had would be an inside dog with outside access as it does get cold here and we would never leave a dog outside in the cold, maybe I would with a huskie I'm not sure, but we're here to talk Rottweilers.

If you believe I'm an awful human for rehoming Jameson, you wouldn't be the first and you likely aren't the last. I just ask you to trust me when I tell you we genuinely tried everything we could. The rehoming decision was not an easy one, but I do not regret it. The safety of my nieces and nephew was in my opinion, at risk when they visited and I would not hesitate to make the same decision again. If we get a Rottweiler or any dog for that matter, I am just as dedicated if not more so than ever before, to get that dog proper training and to do everything in my abilities to continue that training to the best of my ability.

So tell me, is a Rottweiler right for me?
maybe another boxer is a better fit for you.

as far as the dane……that dog wouldnt have made it 30 seconds after biting if it were me. hopefully the new owners understand the dog and it’s a better situation for all involved.
 
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