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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I need help!!





I'm having so many problems with my rott. Ever since my husband left to go to Iraq, she doesn't listen to a word I say. I can't helpbut scream and I know better than that. The only time she is good is when she is sleeping at night. I am currently in a basic training class with her, and she does well there but when we get home she goes hyper on me. I had her pottied trained at one time, but I think I may have to start over with that. Any suggestions?????
 

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You need to put her on a lead ( not leash ) a 6 or 8 inch lead

until she realizes your ALPHA ..... your right start ALL over

leave the lead on ... in the house out of the house

Don't scream .... and DON'T yell at her ..... you will break her spirit

then you have nothing might as well get another type of DOG

firmly correct her ... tug that lead make her sit at your side and

correct and teach .... with that upset mommy voice not LOUD just mad


Training classes are for the owner ..... you need to pay more attention

then your puppy .... there nice for socailization and a lil monkey see

monkey do .... BUT there more for YOU ....


start all over UP CLOSE and PERSONAL .... thats how to train

put her on a lead and get right in her face .....

its all in doing it over and over and then again

it IS gonna break your heart to do it .... BUT don't break hers

treat her like a lil child ..... and if at all possable train without treats

train and then take five and give treats .... she should WORK for

a pat on the head and a " good girl " not for food .....


GOOD LUCK

remember if you break her spirit .... ( yelling ) she will be scared of

you FOREVER ..... rather have her do things out of love then fear
 

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Hi and welcome to the board. Do you have a crate for your Baby? How old is she? I am not a rottie expert by any means but the others will help you soon. I have a trainer for our boyand heis just 9 months old and she had me put Xari in his crate when he got real keyed up and it really works. I just did it as a matter of fact before I got on here. She also told me he would hit his teenage stage and would not mind and from that point I had to be firm and I make him sit for every thing he does, going out side, eating and so on, he must work for me to get a reward no matter what. I have had a time but it isgetting better and he is so worth it. I am doing him as if he were my child and I have raised 4 of them
I don't let him get by with any thing I would not have let them do. Just hang in there and be firm and do the crate when she goes wild, it really helps. Again welcome and they are great here and they sure know more than me but I just wanted you to know you will get a lot of help here.
 

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Sounds like she is the boss.


Start making her do things to get things.Sit before you feed her ,sit before you let her out.You need to have her on a leash and make sure she does what you say.Make sure you tell her when she does things right too.Even if it was something small make a big deal out of it.Some people get so caught up in the dog being bad they don't praize the good.


It will take time to get back in control but keep working on it.
 

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this is long, but may help



Nothing In Life Is Free Program:
(NILF)




This program has been very useful in training dogs that have decided they will do as they please, regardless of your wishes. If you find yourself with a dog that continually gets on your couch or bed and refuses to get off, or insists on being petted when IT wishes to be petted, rather than when you decide to pet it. This program may very well help you greatly! Same goes for those "headstrong dogs," that flat our refuse to come when you call, defend their food dish and toys from you and other humans in your household. "Nothing in life is free" can help. "Nothing in life is free" is not a cure-all, that will solve every behavior problem but it will help your canine companion to behave better in your family "pack," because it trusts and accepts you as "the pack leader," and is confident knowing its place in your family.
<H2>How to practice "nothing in life is free:"</H2>



<TABLE cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 width="100%">
<T>
<TR>
<TD vAlign=line width=42>
</TD>
<TD vAlign=top width="100%">Using positive reinforcement methods, teach your dog a few commands and/or tricks. "Sit," "Down" and "Stay" are important commands and of course you can add "Shake," "Speak" and "Rollover" which are fun tricks to teach your dog. Training your dog also has the pleasant side effect of creating a stronger bond between canine and master.</TD></TR>
<TR>
<TD vAlign=line width=42>
</TD>
<TD vAlign=top width="100%">Once your dog knows a few commands, you can begin to practice "nothing in life is free." Before you give your dog anything (food, a treat, a walk, a pat on the head) it must first perform one of the commands it has learned.

For example: </TD></TR></T></TABLE>
<TABLE borderColorDark=#800000 borderColorLight=#800000 border=1>
<T>
<TR>
<TH borderColor=#000080 borderColorLight=#000080 bgColor=#c0c0c0 borderColorDark=#000080>YOU</TH>
<TH borderColorLight=#000080 bgColor=#c0c0c0 borderColorDark=#000080>YOUR DOG</TH></TR>
<TR>
<TD>Put your dog's lead on to go for a walk</TD>
<TD>Must sit until you've put the lead on </TD></TR>
<TR>
<TD>Feed your dog</TD>
<TD>Must sit and stay until you've put the bowl down and said "OK"</TD></TR>
<TR>
<TD>Wish to play a game of fetch or tug-o-war</TD>
<TD>Must sit and shake hands each time you throw the toy</TD></TR>
<TR>
<TD>Wish to give the dog a treat</TD>
<TD>Must sit, and perform one of the fun tricks you've taught him</TD></TR>
<TR>
<TD>Rub your dog's belly </TD>
<TD>Must lie down and rollover before being petted</TD></TR></T></TABLE>
<TABLE cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 width="100%">
<T>
<TR>
<TD vAlign=line width=42>
</TD>
<TD vAlign=top width="100%">Once you've given the command, don't give your dog what it wants until it does what you want. Being consistent is EXTREMELY IMPORTANT! If he refuses to perform the command, walk away, come back a few minutes later and start the process over again. If your dog refuses to obey the command, be patient and remember that eventually it will have to obey your command in order to get what it wants. (Think of the dog as a headstrong Teen, rebelling. Eventually their desire for whatever it is they want, will outweigh their desire to rebel, and they'll bend to your will.)</TD></TR>
<TR>
<TD vAlign=line width=42>
</TD>
<TD vAlign=top width="100%">Make sure your dog knows the commands well and understands what you want before you begin practicing "nothing in life is free." </TD></TR></T></TABLE>


The benefits of this program:



<TABLE cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 width="100%">
<T>
<TR>
<TD vAlign=line width=42>
</TD>
<TD vAlign=top width="100%">Most dogs assume a neutral (Omega) or submissive role toward people, but some dogs will challenge their owners for dominance. Requiring a dominant dog to work for everything it wants is a safe and non-confrontational way to establish control. This in understood by the canine brain because it's desire to understand it's "pack status," is ingrained.</TD></TR>
<TR>
<TD vAlign=line width=42>
</TD>
<TD vAlign=top width="100%">Dogs who may never display aggressive behavior such as growling, snarling, or snapping, or otherwise acting out in a physical manner, may still manage to attempt to subtly manipulate you. These dogs may display affectionate, though "pushy" behavior, such as nudging your hand to be petted or "worming" its way on to the furniture in order to be close to you. This technique gently reminds even the subtly "pushy" dog that it must abide by your rules. </TD></TR>
<TR>
<TD vAlign=line width=42>
</TD>
<TD vAlign=top width="100%">Obeying commands helps build a fearful dog's confidence; having a strong leader and knowing its place in the "pack," helps to make the submissive dog feel more secure. </TD></TR></T></TABLE>
<H2>Why this technique works:</H2>


Animals that naturally live in packs, like dogs, establish a social structure within the pack, commonly called a dominance hierarchy. This dominance hierarchy serves to maintain order, reduce conflict and promote cooperation among pack members. In order for your home to be a safe and happy place for pets and people, it's best that the humans in the household (ALL the humans, young and old) assume the highest positions in the dominance hierarchy. Practicing "nothing in life is free" effectively and gently communicates to your dog that its position in the hierarchy is subordinate to yours and the rest of your human family as well. From your dog's point of view, children also have a place in this hierarchy. Because children are small and can get down on the dog's level to play, dogs often consider them to be playmates, rather than superiors. With the supervision of an adult, it's a good idea to encourage children in the household to also practice "nothing in life is free" with your dog.


This does work. Good luck


Barb
 

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Yea, this article Barb sent you has done wonders for me and my German Shpherd. He has a dominant personality and would like to be alpha. But you have to always show him you are without being harsh. Zeus knows I am, but every now and then he likes to test me and see if I am still the strong one. Just like in a wolf pack.
 

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The only thing I want to add is about the yelling ...I tell people just imagine a stranger walking down a street yelling and their arms going wild ...wouldn't you think they are a bit nuts ? Well just imagine your dog looking at you yelling at him ! He thinks your nuts too ...
Just lower your voice he will get that your in charge .
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks for all the help I'll going to try these! My rotti is 5 months old, and has a kennel she goes in when I'm at work, and at night time! ANy more suggestions feel free! I need all the help I can get at this present time!!
 

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i'll probably be on the couch for a week for saying this since she reads this MB too
but here goes


my 10 week old male has no respect for my girlfriend..


i save her daily...when she tries to walk him he hangs on her pant leg


if we are walking him together and she has the leash he tries to pull away from her to let me walk him


he doesnt touch my clothes but has demolished quite a few bra and panties of hers


she cant seem to get him into his cage...i say get in and he does it


when she tries to walk him he flops on the ground and refuses to get up


to be brutally honest with you i kinda like it that way..mine mine mine!!!


we have a running dispute as to who he really belongs to


she picked him out so she figures thats all it takes..hehe


should be interesting when he grows up and weighs more than her


they are both scheduled for obedience training may second


heres a daily sentence heard in our house "Seaaaan come get YOUR dog"
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
When my husband was home, it was the same way (meka wouldn't listen to me but listen to him)! I have always heard that this certain breed is a one person dog? Could this be what I'm going through???If this is the case, since she was only two months old when he left will she still remember him??
 

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May I ask where you live in North Carolina ? How far from South Carolina are you ? Next weekend in Chester State Park ( SC ) there is the biggest Rottweiler show in the country. It is more than just a show it is a protection Tourney as well. Just thought I would mention it because if you love the breed there will be plenty there to see. Lots of people to talk with. Just figured I'd let you know about the event. I am going down there all the way from NY. I'm bringing my girl and a friend of mine is bringing three of his dogs.


http://www.cwrcrotts.com/2006-USRC-National_Sieger-Show.html
 

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I don't believe it has to do with being a one person dog. (although some prefer one person over another I think). It has to do with who the dog respects as Alpha. Bodacious your girlfriend needs to take charge. She should impliment the NILF program. She should sit in front of him and eat, then feed him. She needs to make him respect her. It's not always easy, but for her sake later down the road it needs to be done. He needs to know he's at the bottom of the pack even below her. Obedience training is a good place to start. She should try just walking him in the house, and if he goes after her clothing, remove the leash, ignore him and try again a few minutes later. Continue until he gets a clue. Then maybe move outside doing the same thing.


Good luck, it's a lot of hard work.


Barb
 

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Women, take charge now ! If you don't you will be in trouble later on when they are bigger then you ....bodacious's girlfriend and emsdolphin , I have trained and been the boss from the beginning of all my pups . My hubby is 6ft 4 and 260 I'm 5ft2 and 115 ...I have done all the training but my hubby wants to take the credit ! I will say the dogs do listen to him because of his stature and his deep voice , but he has not put a days work into training one of MY dogs ! I have had to work hard at it ! Like Donna says take baby steps with everything you do with them . Barb here has posted really great tips for you to follow ...print them out and put them on your fridge toread andfollow them everyday !! Good luck and happy training !!
 
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