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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello All,

I'm looking for a bit of information to help me make some decisions.

I have owned Rottis in the past and am very comfortable with the breed. I am currently looking for my next male pup. In the meantime, I am fostering dogs. I own my home with my wife and 5yrs old daughter. We are fostering any and all types of dogs that need help. My questions mainly revolve around fostering and adopting while expecting a Rotti pup, when I have the Rotti pup, and once he is grown.

Ideally, I will foster until my pup is born and comes home, then stop for - here's the first question - how long? I was thinking at least 1 year to get some training on the pup and let him bond to us. Once he is fairly well trained, if it takes more than a year so be it, I would look to adopt a female. Foster then adopt would be the route since it would allow me to assess compatibility before committing. Eventually, I would be open to bringing in a third dog and/or continuing to foster.

A couple questions regarding my plan, however. Would it still be advisable to foster on and off while raising my pup? I know a male/female combo is best due to same sex aggression, but my question is, does that still apply as strongly if the other male is a soft breed? If we fall in love with a foster prior to the pup coming in the house and want to adopt, is this advisable?

I know so much depends on the individual dog and his temperament, but in general, should I expect great difficulty having a male Rotti pup and fostering dogs? What about having two males in the house, one being of a softer breed/temperament than your typical Rotti? I have never owned two dogs at once but I would like to and I am just wondering the best route to go with fostering, adopting, and bringing in a new male pup. Any advice/experience is appreciated!

OBM
 

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Wonderful that you want to foster! I would think once you have your Rottie puppy I would give him that full year with you, and with training before thinking of fostering again. Remember that they can and do learn good stuff from another dog...and bad stuff. :(

Once you are ready to foster when your pup has some training under his belt ....then I would still pick a female to foster. You could have luck fostering a male softer breed that would get along with your Rottie pup?? But then again...you could not? Or they could get along for a year or so...and then decide one has to die.:confused: I've never had any problems having male/female combos. No fights...no brawls...no snipping...nothing. The females usually end up in charge...and that seems to work in the dog world. Don't be surprised if that happens and don't try to change nature. Probably is better if the female you foster is a bit older than your own pup. If your pup is 1, then a 2-4 year old female would be good. Still young enough to play....but not two juvenile dogs in the house together is probably much easier.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for the input BBD! Glad to see my thinking was along the right track regarding taking a year off with the new pup. I will definitely keep with that plan.

So would that mean once I have my male and female in the house, I'm pretty much out of the foster game? Or would I be okay bringing in other females, assuming the female I adopt is a softer breed? I don't want to live the crate and rotate life so I will do what I must to avoid that, just sucks if I really have to stop helping once I have my own dogs, there are a lot of dogs in need right now.
 

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I think that will really depend on what breed of foster you may bring into the home. Also the age of the foster. You don't have to give up fostering...but having 2 adult Rottweilers may make it much harder to foster certain dogs. If it's an older, more mature dog of a softer breed it could work? If it's a young pup that is not too annoying it could also work. With fosters they really don't have to be mingling too much with your own dogs....they are often happy to be crated and just get the lay of the land. You will be spending alone time with a foster to really get to know the dog and do some training also....to prepare it for being adopted. Or you could become a 'foster fail'...and end up adding a third dog to your home. :)
 

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I think you already have a sense of what you will need to do! Agree with all the posts as well. I’ve also fostered with my own dogs and it does depend on temperament, which you and others already know. I’ve also had two males, one a foster and one who was with me for a long time. That said, I was confident in my male that he would not be aggressive. I also was confident that the foster male would not challenge. It’s wonderful to foster no matter what the breed. Not many people can (or are not willing) to do it. I still do but it’s very difficult to give them up. Only other thing to mention is your new baby is going to require a lot of attention and fosters definitely get attached. I’m not sure I agree with just crating a foster dog…..part of the benefit for rescue groups is to integrate a dog into the family to be sure they are placed correctly and you can give the new family a lot of information they normally wouldn’t have. Good luck! FYI….my Rotties have all been rescues of different ages. If you are set on a puppy, then a rescue Rottie isn’t an option but mine have learned quickly, bonded and been great family dogs….
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Yeah BBD, the breeds definitely matter. I would only have the one Rotti, my male pup. Any other dogs would be softer breeds, likely a Husky mix of some sort as that's what is mainly surrendered to the rescue I'm fostering for. A lot are coming from Nunavut because of the high kill rate up there, so they are all Husky/Malamute mixes, or something like that. Also, because of how they grow up, the dogs I'm fostering and others like them are very dog oriented. Having my dog in the house but crating the foster guys would not work well. It would be non-stop Husky whining lol. I think keeping just the one Rotti in the house will make success more likely with more than 2 dogs and reduce my chances of needing to crate and rotate. Hahaha if I wasn't waiting to find and raise my pup before adopting I would have foster failed already. The two guys I have right now are such good natured dogs. Kids, people, other dogs, all perfectly fine.

Thanks for your reply, Binky. I completely understand what you mean about it being hard to give them up lol. Yeah, I definitely don't want another dog in the house while raising a brand new puppy, so that is not on the table. I will take a short break from fostering when I get my new pup to ensure proper bonding to me and so on. The rescue I'm with certainly does ask a ton of questions for the adoption bio so I see what you mean about the fosters needing to be integrated for proper assessment.

My main issue with adopting a Rotti is I would like to title this pup in obedience, with a BH being my top goal. My last dog was from strong working lines and I loved his intensity and intelligence. So easy to train and so eager to work. I'm looking for a similar dog in that regard and forgive my ignorance if needed, but I just assumed that finding a dog like this through a rescue would be quite difficult since a person that breeds such a dog should take him back if the owners can't keep him. Is it possible to find what I'm looking for through a rescue? Not a 1 in a million shot possible, but actually possible lol.

I will do both, buy and adopt, but with a dog like a Rotti I just feel it's best to buy vs adopt, for my purposes. Definitely open to other opinions on this though. I'm brand new to fostering.
 
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