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hello everyone. I am new at the breeding game. I know the rottweiler breed very well. I have a male who is one year old and just beutiful. he is 150-170 lbs right now and not fat at all. He is just big framed. I have a female that is three and is a 1/3 the size of her. He has the pefect markings and a huge block for a head. I would like to know how to go about and pick the perfect female for him and how to get his name out there to hopefully show that he is one of the best rotties that you will ever see.
 

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Hi I talked to you on the working rottweiler list.I did find your female in AKC records,but no OFA.


If you are trying to become a good breeder,then you need to show your dog in what ever venue you are interested in.Conf and working.It will take years to a stablish your self as some one with good quality dogs.The hips and elbows should be certified at age 2 and your dog should come form a line of healthy hips at the least.(no one with good females will breed to a dog without theses things.


If you just are looking to produce puppies and have no thought to the welfare of the breed then you are on the right track you already have a dog.


Donna
 

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I have to stand by what Donna said. I have been there tryed that. To be honest, it is not wearth my dogs life to try to breed. I almost lost my Rottie a week ago. Never will I go throught that again. I have to say this too, I was warned. With Rotties there is way more to it than just looks. Hip, elbows, eyes , heart & thyrod all CERT. What if A pup gets stuck? What is mom starts to bleed out? Dally's marking are 1st class to. She is everything they call for in a standard Rottie. She will be fixed Not breed. She will soon start back on her Theropy dog training. That way she can make her own mark on the world.


Shell
 

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A bunch of us were sitting around talking about having puppies at the kennel club.I've had near misses,I've lost puppies but not adults durning birth.A friend with Berners has lost adult females durning or right after birth and whole litters.(she has been in to her breed alot longer then I.)While we were telling our horror stories a friend with Poodles was listening she had just finished all the testing on her dog and had a CH male already lined up.She went home and made an apointment to have her female spayed.She said she did not want to take the chance on lossing her girl.


Everyone who does deside to breed puts their females at risk.It is something we hope will not happen,but it does .


Donna
 

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Barcurdan you are to funny at time. I love you look on things in here at times. 170 does not seem to me like a good breeding size. Dallas is only 85 pnds. And trust me when I say you can't count a rid on her with out putting your hands on her.


Shell
 

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I agree 170lb is a bit BIG! my male is 145 and he's huge !!! I wanna see a pic tooooooo and Dan it's full figured not big boned
thats my Kitty shes a full figured girlat 115
but don't let her hear ya say that !!!
 

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<BLOCKQUOTE dir=ltr style="MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px">


Should you professionally breed a dog that big? Isn't that way over the standard? I thought you were supposed to breed to improve the breed, staying within the standard. I did read you can breed by trying to improve upon the dogs fault so would that mean breeding him to a smaller rott female to have standard size puppies? I wish you luck, just make sure you are doing whats best for the breed, not just because youTHINK your dog would have awesome puppies. I agree with Donna that you should try showing him and see what response you get from professionals-You also have to take into consideration the animals temperament. If your really serious about breeding him I would have some professional breeders take a look at him, they have the eye for that sort of thing. You may think he's awesome but a professional can look at him and see his faults, and give you an honest opinion on whether you should breed him. I hope things work out for you-Remember, if you find you shouldn't breed him, YOU STILL HAVE A GREAT DOG, he just wasn't meant to produce. Mine will never sire puppies, but he will still be my best friend. Some of the best pets are not meant to reproduce...but they produce an abundance of love, and devotion, and that is enough. I don't know if this is the answer you were looking for, but in your quest for answers talk to many people, have them look at your dog, AND LISTEN TO WHAT THEY SAY....people critiqueing your dog can look at him and see things you may never have considered. Either way, whether you breed him or not, if he's a good companion, you have a winner! Best of Luck! </BLOCKQUOTE>
 
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