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Welcome to the forum!! There are many good Rottweiler breeders in Canada. Are you meaning Esmond Rottweilers? Do you have a dog from them? As far as I know they are still breeding. Where about are you in Canada? Having a location would help with suggestions.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for the reply! No I don’t have a Dog from Esmond and never had a Rotty before. Really want one though and I’m in Toronto(GTA) Website says they have dogs only for USA now. I could be reading something wrong. That site is very busy and filled with info.
 

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Esmond Rotts is one of the top breeders in Canada....but they have very long waiting lists and are very picky to where their pups go. What experience do you have with dogs? Have you had a dog before? Rottweilers are not a good breed for the first time dog owner. They need lots of training and firm but fair leadership. You must dedicate at least the first two years of their life to training and work. What kind of life style do you live? Active? Homebody? Love watching Netflicks? Socializing? etc.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Had a yellow lab born black about 20 years ago when I was single. Plan to put in all the work and take the Rotty to training centres and what not. I know many people who’s first dog was a Rottweiler and they wouldn’t change it for anything. Family with two hard working busy parents but stay at home work. Like to get out on the trails with my son. Would enjoy a dog very much. Go to the gym and have lots of extracurricular things to do with my son. Strongly believe he would love the dog as well. Especially if we get from a pup. Would be cool to compete in obedience/training competitions as well. We as a family want a great dog as a companion and house/child protector. Esmond Rottweiler seems to be the dream one.
 

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As someone that volunteered in Rottweiler Rescue for many years...NO, Rottweilers are not a good choice of breed for the first time dog owner. That is why so many would end up in shelters and rescue. Puppies are cute...people often got them from BYB's or poor breeders and as the cute puppy grew the owner's lack the time, devotion and experience in what these pups needed. At anywhere from around 7 months to 2 years were dumped in shelters or given up because the dog "growled at them", or bit someone, etc.

How old is your son? You may have to give up most of your free time if you get a Rottweiler pup. You may not be able to get to the gym....or be able to take your son to all sort of extracurricular things. Having a puppy is very much like having a new born baby in the house. No sleep, housetraining, obedience training...and lots of attention to a young dog. A good breeder will screen you well...they will want to know your lifestyle and if you would be a good choice for one of their pups. Be prepared!
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I owned a Lab before. It was many years ago but I did so Im not a first time dog owner. Only a first Rottweiler owner if I get one. Your dog will growl at you sometimes that’s a given. You repeat things too much that you already shown them you need them to do. Maybe try and mess with them while they are eating. Lots of things I know and will have to teach my wife and son. Your dog bites someone that’s just irresponsible dog ownership PERIOD! Need to know your dog and the temperament. I didn’t think I wouldn’t be able to get to the gym. Never really thought of that so that’s good to know. The extra curricular things will definitely need to be cut down for a bit. My son is 6 years old but the size of a 9 year old. I don’t really understand the no sleep thing so maybe you can elaborate. I’ll prepare to be screened by breeder if one is found. I want a breeder that would be thrilled to let me have one of their pups. Once again appreciate all the help.
 

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Thanks for more info!! Labs are not near a Rottweiler in temperament. It's the reason that Labs and Goldens are number #1 and #2 in popularity. They are easy going...and don't have that protective instinct that Rottweilers do. Things have also changed in training in the last 10-15 years...much more positive training is done as well as balanced training. Do NOT start sticking your hand or mess with them while they are eating...that's a sure way to start food aggression. I love the breed and have been owned by them for the last 30 years....but most of the time I really don't recommend them to most people wanting a dog.

They can be dominant, pushy and strong minded. You have to set boundaries with them and be consistent....the whole family. Most well bred in standard temperament Rottweilers are not dog park material. They are often same sex aggressive with other dogs. They may not start a fight...but they will not back down if some dog is bugging them. Where do you plan on exercising and walking your dog??

The no sleep thing is getting up during the night for at least the first month to let them pee/poo. Young puppies must be crate trained and cannot hold it all night. During the day when they are awake they need to go out at least every 30 minutes for at least 2-3 months...then they can go longer if crated. Lots of work especially the first 6-7 month till they are safely house trained. That means going out with coat and boots and leash on during rain, snow, sleet, etc.

I've told you the realistic things about the breed....but they are also very fun, loving, loyal, smart and protective of their family. They can cause problems being too protective of their family. If your son has a friend over, and they are rough housing or chasing , or play fighting....the dog does not understand and may attempt to bite the friend of your son. We had quite a few dogs given up to rescue because of this problem.

My kids were teens when we got our first Rottweiler....and they did fine. We had 3 Rottweilers that our grandkids grew up with....they were good with the grandkids too...but I always supervised because of their size.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Oh I know that Rottweilers have a completely different temperament. I’m totally ready for it and looking forward to it. So your saying dog parks aren’t for Rottweiler’s. I’ve been around some and seen them. They did however have on the mussel. Which I would hope with training and kennel socialization she wouldn’t need. I’m looking for a female if that makes the difference. Yea puppies are super super cute and wife won’t shut up about them. Also when they are big, they look like a small cute bear. I love Rottweiler’s and want a big dog. Actually Cane Corso is my favourite but they are ugly she says. She happy… me happy! You know how it goes. I’m sure that getting a dog from a good breeder has significantly changed over the years. As you said the training just gets better and better. Regarding exercising and walking. Walking would be in my neighbourhood as well as an empty field I find where I can see nobody is around. Exercising at dog parks it’s about how the dogs are trained and obedience they have to owners. Anything that is seen we stop it before anything can happen I would imagine. Although I could be seriously wrong. I like Labs and been there done that. Can’t get into Golden’s at all. I don’t think they are man’s dog. I need to learn more but crate training is an absolute must for sure. Although want to love the dog allow her to be part of family and let her freely roam. I understand it will take time but crate or garage is not the life I want to give to my dog. I think that’s horrible and those owners are the worst. So getting up all night like it’s a new born baby I wouldn’t imagine it would be that bad. Having friends or visitors for contracting or some kind of service. That’s when the dog wouldn’t be present and in the yard for a bit. Eventually if the dog sees a friend or outside family member we would show it’s ok and nothing to be protective about. Plenty of insight you’ve given me and lots you’ve heard from me. Do you still say that you would steer me away from a Rottweiler???
 

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I'm not sure how much energy, training and time you whole family will be able to put into a Rottweiler puppy. A good breeder will grill you well....and it will depend on the breeder. Do you have a fenced in yard? Where do you plan to take the puppy to obedience classes? Who will be your vet?

As far as crate training....usually most people use crates for their puppies and young dogs till they can be trusted to be free in the house. Puppies need lots of sleep...and when they are not sleeping...if not watched are either peeing or pooping or chewing on something and getting into trouble. Crating is for their own safety...and you need to teach a puppy how to accept the crate. They are great when young when you cannot keep an eagle eye on them....or just need a break yourself. Much like a playpen for a toddler. It's their safe place. Once they are older, and housetrained and out of the chewing stage...and you have put away everything they may get into trouble with...then you can start giving them more freedom.

Honestly, if I was screening you for adopting a Rottweiler from rescue....I would have turned you down for a Rottweiler. Not enough dog experience. You mentioned your friends have Rottweilers. Why don't you volunteer to watch one when they want to go away for a weekend or on a holiday. It may help you decide.

I always tried to steer people with no ,or little dog experience to an easier breed....or a nice gentle breed mix. Once you've lived with and trained a dog...then decide if a Rottweiler would be for you. I also think it may be very hard to have a good ethical breeder sell you a puppy. Most want experienced dog homes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Ok still sounds like we shouldn’t get one. I appreciate your honesty. Been doing a lot of thinking about it. We really do want one and will just have to see what the future holds. You have been with Rottweiler’s for 30 years is a testament to your understanding of them. No fenced in yard as of yet so maybe that could be a problem. Although I didn’t see it as one. The obedience classes again that comes down to the research. Same goes for the vet and any other thing associated with having the dog. A cousin of mine is also on his second Rottweiler and he was a first time dog owner and totally him and his wife and two kids just adored the dog. Some hard times sure but well worth it.

I hear you on the crate training thing and like I said it’s totally necessary. Totally like the playpen for the toddler. A break is definitely needed sometimes and as a pup they will need to feel safe. A friend of mine actually had to break his Rotty out of the crate situation. Absolutely loved being in it even passed 8 or 9 months old. Put away all they can get into trouble with? That could be almost anything. They just need to shown what and what not to do. NO?

Things that are important have to be made time for. That’s just a fact so adjustments would have to made. A part of life and necessary in a situation with a new dog of any sort. The Rottweiler more it seems but nonetheless you understand what I’m saying. Regarding rescue I would NEVER have a Rottweiler from that situation. Would have to be right from around 8 week or so. The dog would need to grow with us and that makes a huge difference. Rescuing one that’s big presents way too many challenges I don’t think my family could handle. The idea of watching one for a weekend or vacation is also a great idea. That’s definitely something I’m gonna look into. In the meantime I’m curious as to your recommendations with regards to other options and the gentle breed mix you speak of. Once again you have been incredible in providing much insight on what’s needed and how things will be.
 

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This is a very educational conversation, and I've enjoyed following it, but now I'm going to butt in.

I have had Rotts for about 25 years. Previous Rotts were always acquired from good breeders as pups. When my last pup died from an immune disorder at the age of 3, my husband and I decided that, at our age, raising a Rott puppy was too much work for all the reasons BBD has stated in the posts. I never though I would accept a rescued Rott because of not knowing the dog's background, but I really missed having a Rottweiler in my life. I began to look at available young adult dogs in a 4 state area, and finally found Lizzie. She was being fostered with a rescue group in another state and had been evaluated by them. They said she was calm and sweet, appeared to be housebroken and was 2-3 years old. I brought her home last January. She is wonderful. She moved right in like this had been her home forever. She even likes our elderly shih-tzu. We are both crazy about her.

I told you all that to tell you this: never say NEVER to a rescued Rottweiler. They need love and a home as much as, or more than, a pup.

Just my $.02 worth.
 

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This is a very educational conversation, and I've enjoyed following it, but now I'm going to butt in. I have had Rotts for about 25 years. Previous Rotts were always acquired from good breeders as pups. When my last pup died from an immune disorder at the age of 3, my husband and I decided that, at our age, raising a Rott puppy was too much work for all the reasons BBD has stated in the posts. I never though I would accept a rescued Rott because of not knowing the dog's background, but I really missed having a Rottweiler in my life. I began to look at available young adult dogs in a 4 state area, and finally found Lizzie. She was being fostered with a rescue group in another state and had been evaluated by them. They said she was calm and sweet, appeared to be housebroken and was 2-3 years old. I brought her home last January. She is wonderful. She moved right in like this had been her home forever. She even likes our elderly shih-tzu. We are both crazy about her. I told you all that to tell you this: never say NEVER to a rescued Rottweiler. They need love and a home as much as, or more than, a pup. Just my $.02 worth.
Love what you said about rescue Rotties. We are on our third with other breeds in between and LOVE the rotts. Our latest is 4 years old and she was raised with love. Her mid age owner passed away suddenly, and she was fostered for short time until a chance encounter and she is now our canine daughter. We love her to the moon and back. Rotts do have their own behaviors as you know
 
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