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So my six-year-old female Rottweiler started limping out of nowhere last Monday. Her back right leg. She's done this before so I thought she just hurt herself jumping onto the deck again. But the limbing persisted. On Wendesday I took her into the vet and the vet told me that she had torn her cruciate ligament or acl ligament in human terms. Other than the limp there is nothing wrong with her, she eats and sleeps normally everything, it's just the limp.

OPINIONS NEEDED!
The vet told me she needs surgery but I can't afford it. If your dog ever had this what did you do? I have put her on supplements, being fish oil, glucosamine chondroitin and a joint supplement called Flexadin. I was thinking of adding Turmeric paste to that but was waiting not to over load her with supplements so quickly. I have limited her walking around, so she can rest. No stairs or jumping onto couch either. I may also purhcase a brace for her leg as well.

Please Help Questions Regarding Swollen Hock
But then yesterday I noticed that on her limping leg her hock is swollen I put some pressure on it and my dog reacted glaring at me as if to say that's hurting me stop. I've massaged her leg where the vet said that her cruciate ligament was torn but she doesn't react at all. Is my vet wrong? I'm fearing that it may be cancer, as I know that Rotties have a high cancer rate. As of now she goes back and forth between being unable to put any pressure on her injured leg to being able to bounce back and forth from good leg to bad leg. It's like she gets a little bit better and then goes back to complete limping, being unable to use her foot.

Also another bit of info regarding her past. About two years ago she had a limp on her front left leg, it didn't seem to both her, meaning pain, it was just stiff making her have a slight limp. Took her to the vet and they said it wasn't anything to be concerned about, in her old age it was probually just wear and tear. The limp persisted for about a year and then went away.

I know the automatic response is to take her to the vet and I know I need to but I'm not in a good place with money right now so yeah. Anything you guys think of, any opinions or anything. Would be thankful. Thanks.
 

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First, if the vet took x-rays to diagnose the torn ligament, they would have shown cancer so if the vet didn't say it was cancer I wouldn't think that is what it was.

The swollen hock has to be related to the torn ligament and that the dog is still using it. You need to keep her off of it the best you can.

I am truly sorry that your girl is going through this. It sounds like she is in pain. I would at least ask the vet for some pain meds. As far as the supplements, I would definitely add the tumeric because it is a powerful anti-inflammatory and I've read even prevents cancer. That is why I add it to every meal for my girl.

I don't know if massaging the area will help but you can put ice on the swollen leg to ease the swelling and pain. My female Rottweiler (also 6) was jumping and hurt her front feet and they swelled up to look like hoofs. The vet did not x-ray but gave us 2 weeks of Rimadyl and said if she did not improve we would have to go back and get x-rays but she got better with the meds.

I dug way back to find a link I had posted before on how to get help when you can't pay the vet bills. I also found a wiki link on how to heal a dog's torn ligament at home. Maybe you can find something in there you can use.

Also, In my area the Humane Society and I think even the SPCA offer veterinary help at low cost and I've read posts from members here recommending veterinarian colleges as a source for help with injured or sick dogs. Maybe you can get some help there or at least get pointed in the right direction of someone who can help you in your area.

Here are the links I talked about. I hope you will be able to get the help you need. Best of luck to you and your girl.

https://iheartdogs.com/cant-pay-for-your-pets-needed-care-these-12-programs-can-help/

https://www.wikihow.com/Heal-a-Torn-Dog-ACL-Without-Surgery
 

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Thanks

Thanks so much for your reply, you helped a lot thank you!

I'll add the paste to her meals starting tonight. And the only reason I think it may be cancer is that the vet didn't take x rays as she just felt around her leg and said that her ligament was torn.

But I'm going to the vet tomorrow to get her some pain meds.
 

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You must have surgery for a torn ACL. No other option. Torn ligaments do not heal themselves, they cannot heal themselves. Put on a credit card, make payments, something. You can't let her limp around in that agony and it doesn't get better on it's own. If you absolutely can't find a way to get surgery, give her to a rescue so they can do it and adopt her out to someone who is better situated to being able to take care of her.

Do you live near a veterinary hospital? Sometimes treatment is cheaper there. Treatment at vet hospitals is stellar, the teaching vets do the surgeries, not the students.

I've had two Rotts who've had torn ACL's and it required surgery on them. There is no getting away from that. Also, I have some bad news for you. One ACL goes out, it's a matter of time that the other leg goes out - probably sooner than later if you have her putting all of her weight on the other leg for an extended period of time. Sure, paying for that is like buying a small economy car, but if the dog means anything to you, you need to find a way to fix her, give her up or put her down. Those are just the plain hard cold facts of the matter.

Dog insurance... that's why I always recommend dog insurance to people. It's better to shell out a hundred bucks a month (or less, the sooner you start them on it the cheaper your payments will be) than come up with thousands of dollars for major surgeries. (of course it's too late for you, but not too late for anyone reading this post - because this poster Martha could be you one day.)

Good luck and I'm sorry to be so blunt.
 

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At 6 years of age...she needs to have surgery to fix it. I had an older girl that tore her's at 10 years of age...and we decided that we were not going to put her through surgery and the long recovery. We did CM (Conservative Management), and supplements, and rest, rest, rest. Only short leash walks,etc. At 10 years of age...it's easy to keep a dog quiet...at 6 years of age not so easy. That same dog developed bone cancer in that leg about 5 months later. No cancer could be seen when the initial x-rays were taken for the knee.

Steph King is right, torn ACL's do not repair themselves....but what happens is that if the dog is kept quiet, then scar tissue develops and it helps to stabilize the knee. The knee will never be perfect again with just scar tissue...but the dog should be able to bear weight on it.

How much does your dog weigh? Is she overweight? Try to get some weight off of her...even a 5 lb weight loss will help her knee. There are still some vets that do the fishing line traditional repair...even on bigger dogs. It's way cheaper then doing a TTA or TPLO repair.

Waiting is not going to do much more damage...make sure that she stays quiet, and is on some sort of pain relief and anti-inflammatory.

As for the swollen hock...I've never seen that with a torn ACL. Sometimes the knee is a bit swollen...but not the hock. Just keep and eye on her, and do the best you can.
 

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I have to chime in here on this. I told you I have gone through this ACL surgery thing twice. First was with Haus, who was a young dog, 5 or 6 y.o. Second time was with an older girl, Saraphina, at 9-10 y.o. We did surgery for both... and I told Saraphina, "baby girl, you better have a long life" because at 9 y.o. it is quite an investment to do the surgery for a dog who might not be with you much longer... so I totally get the trepidation about putting an older dog through surgery only to lose them a short time later to old age (and to spend a fortune on the surgery - we paid out of pocket for both dogs each time and it was a financial burden, to say the least). However, Saraphina, despite going through two ACL surgeries, made it to age 14.

I need to mention this - it is critical. Rottweilers bear pain like no other animal. They will not show how painful their injuries are. Painful areas that continue to be painful, and with bad inflammation have a tendency to get cancer in those areas. My first Rottweiler Summer needed hip replacement and we couldn't afford it, put it off, until the pain in her hip caused cancer in that hip and it was too late for her. I took her to Davis to replace her hip only to be told about the cancer and I had to put her down. It was one of the most horrible times in my entire life. This is the dog that saw me through some terrible personal tragedies and the fact that I didn't get her the hip she needed haunts me to this very day.

She was 11 when I had to put her to sleep, so she had an average Rottie lifespan, but I will spend the remainder of my life wishing I had acted sooner to help her. The problem was, we were a struggling new business (self-employed) and had maxed out all our financial options financing our business. The local vet wouldn't take a payment plan and it was a very difficult time for us on many levels. However, I want to make it clear, it wasn't the fact that I didn't want to put her surgery on a credit card, we just had none with the room. We were between a rock and a hard spot financially. I should have turned to a relative for a loan I suppose, but pride keeps you from a lot of things.

So, again, the moral of the story is to get dog health insurance. No matter what the age, this surgery is critical. The pain they are in will do them in eventually and that is not something you want to live with. If they show pain, it is not minor, it is probably pain that would leave you and I screaming. This is not something to take lightly.

I know I'm being a hard a$$ about this... I just know the repercussions of not handling health issues on a timely basis is heart rending. I favor taking action and if you can't take action yourself, you need to try to find someone else who will.
 
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