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So glad that things are looking better. Some dogs need harder corrections till they really understand what is wanted. It's better to give one hard correction, than nagging with things that are not working. You will probably really need to be a strong leader with her....NO B.S. from her...and she will soon discover that she is not in charge anymore. Just keep it up...and be firm, but fair.
 

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Sounds similar to the trainer we went to. All the collies, labs, shelties etc in the class trotted around nicely through the various exercises, ours could do all of this but would decide to do what she wanted. She learned it quickly but got bored in the repetition.
So the trainer would take the leash and show us things like how to walk more purposefully, pop the lead sharply (but release immediately) to snap her back into paying attention to us.

He said, he wouldn't need to do this with the other dogs so much or so sharply but the correction needs to match the intensity of the behaviour. Not more as that breaks down trust, not less or they don't understand what you are asking of them is important.

A lot of it was teaching patience, getting her to understand she would get to do the fun thing but the boring thing had to come first.

The more wilful and powerful the dog the more you can get out of them in terms of working ability, but they need more training to channel their abilities into something useful. Sadly it is hard to find "jobs" for working dogs with lots of strength and intelligence. You end up needing to be inventive to find outlets for their energies that works for both of you.
The best dogs can be the wayward ones that needs the most work initially as they see the world and want to participate in every bit of it.
 

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Here we are a week later and even being gone for a few days the kids had to handle her. No issues, no biting, just being a good dog for them.
Realise this is an old thread but was really interesting and I wondered if you were still about to let us know how you are getting on?!
 

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It was quite interesting and surprising when he got to our home. I invited him in and of course Phoenix gets all super exited. He just stood my our center island and said nothing, didn't look at her or anything. She jumped up on him a few times and nipped his pants and shirt 3 times. He was counting. I put her leash on her and handed it to him. She jumped again and he gave a sharp quick jerk on the leash and yelled no. This happened 2 more times and boom, she's sitting at his feet looking up at him. He was a lot more forceful than what I expected but it worked. Into the living room we went so he could see the interactions we get when we are in there. Phoenix was starting to get wound up again and she jumped and nipped him. He actually swatted her with the leash and caught her back legs, this happened one more time in a 2 minute span and then she came and sat by me, like hey dude, why you smackin me with this thing. He suggested we use something a bit heavier than her leash. from that moment on Phoenix was a different pup. He would just stand there talking to us as she was watching him. At one point she actually crawled over to him looking for direction/affection. Of course he gave it to her and she just rolled over but that was not what he wanted. He wanted her to come to him and sit down, not lay down. Every time she would lay down, he was stop giving her attention until she sat. Once she did he would give her a few quick pets on the head.

Here we are a week later and even being gone for a few days the kids had to handle her. No issues, no biting, just being a good dog for them. He also suggested that when company comes over she stays in her crate for about 15 minutes and we need to have our company sit at the island on the stools which are up high. Then let her out so she can sniff and realize other people are in the house. We had the chance to do that last night and wow, she came out sniffed for a few and left them be. Then when we had them get up she came back just to see what was happening with the movement and there was no jumping, no nipping. Just acting like a pup should. So we will just keep on keeping on doing what he had suggested and see how she progresses.

One thing that did concern me a bit last evening when I had her out in the back yard playing with a ball, she would give me that blank stare without her nub moving. Kind of freaky but I didn't let her move me with her stare. I moved up to her which broke that stare and back to playing we went.

It sounds like you have an alpha dog. Your trainer has established that HE is the boss, not her.
All puppies are mouthy. Its up to you to decide how far you will allow it to go. The trainer established he is the boss, and will not back down. He smacked her for her disobedience, and she got more respectful immediately. You will have to be ready to smack her as well when she gets out of line. You get it established that YOU are the boss, and you'll be happier, she will be happier and so will your family.
Its just like with horses. Ever watch young colts with broodmares? They will take so much, then will flip around and let the know it all youngster have it with both hind feet. Colts, pups, you have to talk in a language they can understand.

I wish you the best with your pup! She's just trying to figure out where she fits into this world. Give her some guidelines, and an occasional swat if needed, but YOU be the boss.
 
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