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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Now that I am without a Rott, I have decided that I no longer have the energy to raise another puppy, so I have been looking at adoption sites and trying to contact various rescue groups around the southwest. I have yet to get a reply from any of them. This brings me to my first question - why are they so rude about not replying? Do they want potential adopters to get the impression that the rescuers are overworked? Okay, so that's two questions. I did Welsh Corgi rescue for several years, and I absolutely never ignored anyone asking about "my" dogs.

My second and main question is: why do so many rescue organizations insist on adopting in-state only? I would think that they would be more concerned in placing a dog in an ideal home than having the dogs where they can physically put their hands on them. Sounds almost like a form of hoarding. I have a little dog that I adopted from 1200 miles away! There is one group that has age restrictions as well as out-of-state restrictions. Apparently, I'm too old to have a young dog. Never mind what kind of life I lead, or how active I am, age is what they look at. That is ridiculous.

Thanks for letting me vent.
 

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Glad that you are thinking of adopting an older dog. They really do make great companions. It all depends on the rescue? Some are really good and organized and get back to you quickly...and some are run by a couple of volunteers and have their hands full. Have you checked out shelters? That may be your quickest way to find a rescue. I do know that one of the reasons some rescues don't adopt out of state is because if the dog has to be returned back into rescue it makes it very difficult to transport the dog. Rottweilers especially can have a hard time to settle...or the people that adopt the rescue dog do not give the dog a chance, or they give the dog too much freedom and don't listen to what the rescue people have instructed them to do. Often they want the newly adopted dog OUT!!!! :(

I fostered many dogs for rescue and was involved in the adoption procedure. We would give all sorts of information and instructions to the new owner and they just did not listen. One guy wanted the dog he adopted returned after a few days because it chewed his antique dining room table....even though they had been instructed to crate the dog for the first month or so when leaving the dog at home alone. Another person took his newly adopted Rottweiler returned because it bit someone when they took their newly adopted dog to a backyard BBQ! Even though they were told to let the dog settle and not be allowing the dog to meet and greet people for awhile. It can get frustrating when people don't listen!!!:rolleyes:
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I agree that there are challenges to adopting an adult Rott, especially if the rescue or shelter has no idea of the dog's background, (the background couldn't be too good or the dog wouldn't be there) and perfect dogs are few and far between. But isn't that the purpose of applications, home checks and interviews with a potential adopter? I would think that a well organized rescue group would have the rescue network resources to perform a home check, and whatever other verification they might want, in order to allow a dog to go out-of-state. When I was involved in rescue, we were able to provide those verifications not only for corgis, but for other breeds also. I've done them for several breed groups.

The problem with shelters is travel time. When a Rott shows up at, say, a shelter in the LA area, which is 275+/- miles from me, by the time I can drive down there, an active rescue group has already picked the dog up. Or, if the dog is still available, there is some reason why it wouldn't be suitable for me. Travel time and money spent on gas is wasted. Shelters won't hold a dog on the if-come that someone from a long distance away will show up. Most are pretty good at answering questions on the phone, but actually getting the dog is a crap shoot.
 

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Have you checked out rescueme.org? You can find dogs in your state. There are rescue groups and individuals looking to rehome their dogs there. I adopted our last two from that site. I have adopted from Rott Rescue L.A. (I live in Southern Cali) and they checked out my home and approved me. I got two Rotties from them throughout the years. I have referred rescue groups to them when I have had to get approved. In fact, I found a dog in Texas on-line once, and that rescue didn't know me from a hole in the ground and they responded and I told them we had owned Rotties for years, referred them to Rott Rescue, L.A. and I was able to fly to Texas, pick up the Rottie and rented a vehicle to drive him home. They were very nice. The dog was a wonderful boy who deserved everything in the world, he was a sweetheart they had found nearly starved to death and had been beaten quite a bit. Despite his hard luck story he was very loving and protective of me in a very low key way. I wish he had lived longer.
I'm so glad you are looking into a rescue rottie. There are not enough people willing to take them on, and too many people are frightened of them, especially adult dogs. Eight of our 10 Rotties were rescues. I would advise getting health insurance if there are any unforseen issues. Vet care has been getting increasingly diffucult to budget for major surgeries. One never knows with rescues...

Good luck finding a wonderful Rottie.
 

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Lots of dogs in Cali on that site. If you are worried about temperament, may I suggest an animal communicator. I have used Bea Lydecker many times to check animals out and she has helped immensely by filling me in with their backgrounds. Pretty much everything she has ever claimed about their backgrouns has played out in the dog's behaviors. She is reasonably priced and can do it from remote locations to the dog. You can find her selling vitamins on-line if you are interested.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
You mention LA area. Here is a sweet looking female at the pound in that general area who looks to be in desperate straits. ► Rottweiler - Los Angeles County, CA
She is in desperate straits. According to the bio, she is quite ill. Having just spent thousands trying to save Lola, I am not taking on a sick dog.

I have looked at Rescueme.org. It is part of my daily ritual of adoption sites. Yesterday, I applied for one that I found on Adopt-a-pet. It's a male, which I didn't think I wanted, but he is fostering with some people that have shih-tzus. My little dog is a shih-tzu, so it would probably work. There are a couple of others that I will contact. Many of the dogs I've been interested in either can't go out of state :mad: or aren't good with other dogs.

I just keep trying...
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
So this morning, I found a young Rottie girl that I want on Adopt-a-Pet. I was absolutely smitten by the pictures on her bio. She is in Southern California. I began trying to contact the shelter. 5 emails and 6 phone calls (2 messages left) later, no response. I don't believe it! With gas at over $4 per gallon and snow in the mountains between here and there, I'm not going to drive down on the outside chance that someone else adopted her. I am so frustrated!!!!!
 

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So this morning, I found a young Rottie girl that I want on Adopt-a-Pet. I was absolutely smitten by the pictures on her bio. She is in Southern California. I began trying to contact the shelter. 5 emails and 6 phone calls (2 messages left) later, no response. I don't believe it! With gas at over $4 per gallon and snow in the mountains between here and there, I'm not going to drive down on the outside chance that someone else adopted her. I am so frustrated!!!!!
Keep trying! Will be worth it in the end
 
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