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OK, let me tell you a story. This is a true story. Our bookkeeper has had quite a few Labs and Boxers and mixed shepherds over the years. When her son got a pit bull puppy everyone told her it was different and to be careful. I don't know how much pit this dog had in him, he looked to me to be part Great Dane too, tall, long legged, with that very heavy head and pretty intimidating looking, over 100 lbs. She and her family have a ranch where they board horses and they have always let their dogs have the run of the place. The dogs know the boarders and everything was cool until it wasn't. They were gone one evening and a couple of hikers came through even though the fence had a sign up that said no trespassing. The hikers wandered through the ranch and the dogs came up and greeted them, checked them out. I believe at that time they also had 2 labs, a boxer/mastiff mix and the pit. One of the hikers accidentally stepped on the paw of one of the other dogs, the boxer/mastiff I think. When the pit heard the dog scream he decided he had to do something about it. That hiker was lucky to leave with his life. As it was, his leg needed 4 hours of surgery to put back together. The labs never joined in, but I believe the boxer/mastiff did, didn't bite but did harass. There was no human supervision at the time. My friend and her family came home to police and swat who were going to shoot all the dogs before they stopped them. This is California. They had to fight hard and spend thousands in the courts to keep the dog from being PTS.

Dogs that are protective of their pack need guidance and monitoring. They don't always attack and cause as much damage as this one. Granted, it was a pit mix and not a Rott, but we are talking about dog breeds that are bred to be protective. That's what they do. As long as you are aware of this, that's good. However, just look at the scenario, it's epitomizes the difference in the two types of breeds.
 

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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
I see what your saying about them being different and im aware of what can happen when it goes wrong with a rottie and how much damage they can cause.

I am only assuming here but i assume the dogs were all left outside or had access to get out which i would never do i woukd never allow my dogs ( not just labs but any dog i own) to be outside or have access to being outside if im gone and i will always make sure my rottie is happy and comfortable and friends with the dog walker before ever letting her come into my home when im not there to take him for a walk.

I also never ( even with my labs i was the same) allow strangers or kids to just come and put there hands all over my dog if they havent asked me they dont get to stroke or pet my dog and even if they have asked i take my que from the dog from what his body language is saying if hes happy to say hello too then i allow it if hes not or cant be bothered that day i say no to them.

I am very protective of my dogs and will be the same if not more for a Rottie
 

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I started with German Shepherds as dogs. Agis is a Rottie mix, but he has similar personality to my Shepherds and I put that down to the Rottie personality.

Neb is a Husky/Lab/Beagle/who the heck knows mix. He is very laid back and loves to say hi to people and almost all dogs (we waited to neuter him and while he's fine with some intact dogs, if he has an issue with the dog (and I can count on my hands how often that's happened over the years, and he's 13 now, had him since 6 weeks), the dog is intact. But his personality is very different than my GSDs and Agis. Xerxes is a Beagle and if I'm honest while super loving and sweet in the household can be a real dick out outside of our place. He's leash reactive (we've worked on it and he's really improved - and even if we take him somewhere fenced off he chases other dogs baying at them...doesn't make a lot of friends). We love Xerxes with all our heart, and I wouldn't trade him for the world, but even he - reactive as he is - is very different from Agis.

COVID hit about 4.5 months after we adopted Agis. I'd put a lot of work into stuff like socializing him to people coming over - but that all ended. We had a worker come into our unit and while he was gated, he was growling at the man. The other two were silent. Very different attitude. Agis has come out and stood his ground at night with weird people heading towards us (I was uncomfortable). Neb and Xerxes would never even have it occur to them to do that. Agis went through a reactive period with dogs (and still doesn't like little dogs and puppies). We worked through it, but his reaction looked VERY different from Xerxes - and Agis is over twice Xerxes's size. Far more intimidating and would scare the people walking the other dog. And I can't blame them. Agis could do a lot of damage, despite not being the size of a full Rott. He's a powerful dog.

I can only compare Neb (part Lab) to Agis (part Rott) and say their personalities are opposite.

We've put a lot of time training Agis, and have done virtual classes as in person classes were cancelled. When we first had him, in pre-COVID times, we had some private sessions. We've consulted with one-on-one sessions since then.

He is definitely more work and more of a responsibility (due to his breed) then Neb or Xerxes. There have been times I've wished for a lucky-go-Lab, heh. With that said - I don't have purebred Lab experience, so I could be off. And I actually like that he's more protective and suspicious - reminds me of some of the stuff I really liked about my GSDs. But he needs stronger obedience BECAUSE of that.

It sounds like you are willing to put in a lot of work, which I think is good. Agis went through a period of separation anxiety, it seems better now (though I've also been working from home for over a year - try to leave him alone at least a bit every day) - so I do think you can have a Rott and work (not at home). It's been nice being around the boys all the time, but he was okay when I wasn't (after some work).

None of what I've said may be helpful, as all my dogs have been rescues, and Neb isn't a PB Lab and Agis isn't a PB Rott. But hopefully it gives a bit of a comparison.
 

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Discussion Starter · #24 ·
I started with German Shepherds as dogs. Agis is a Rottie mix, but he has similar personality to my Shepherds and I put that down to the Rottie personality.

Neb is a Husky/Lab/Beagle/who the heck knows mix. He is very laid back and loves to say hi to people and almost all dogs (we waited to neuter him and while he's fine with some intact dogs, if he has an issue with the dog (and I can count on my hands how often that's happened over the years, and he's 13 now, had him since 6 weeks), the dog is intact. But his personality is very different than my GSDs and Agis. Xerxes is a Beagle and if I'm honest while super loving and sweet in the household can be a real dick out outside of our place. He's leash reactive (we've worked on it and he's really improved - and even if we take him somewhere fenced off he chases other dogs baying at them...doesn't make a lot of friends). We love Xerxes with all our heart, and I wouldn't trade him for the world, but even he - reactive as he is - is very different from Agis.

COVID hit about 4.5 months after we adopted Agis. I'd put a lot of work into stuff like socializing him to people coming over - but that all ended. We had a worker come into our unit and while he was gated, he was growling at the man. The other two were silent. Very different attitude. Agis has come out and stood his ground at night with weird people heading towards us (I was uncomfortable). Neb and Xerxes would never even have it occur to them to do that. Agis went through a reactive period with dogs (and still doesn't like little dogs and puppies). We worked through it, but his reaction looked VERY different from Xerxes - and Agis is over twice Xerxes's size. Far more intimidating and would scare the people walking the other dog. And I can't blame them. Agis could do a lot of damage, despite not being the size of a full Rott. He's a powerful dog.

I can only compare Neb (part Lab) to Agis (part Rott) and say their personalities are opposite.

We've put a lot of time training Agis, and have done virtual classes as in person classes were cancelled. When we first had him, in pre-COVID times, we had some private sessions. We've consulted with one-on-one sessions since then.

He is definitely more work and more of a responsibility (due to his breed) then Neb or Xerxes. There have been times I've wished for a lucky-go-Lab, heh. With that said - I don't have purebred Lab experience, so I could be off. And I actually like that he's more protective and suspicious - reminds me of some of the stuff I really liked about my GSDs. But he needs stronger obedience BECAUSE of that.

It sounds like you are willing to put in a lot of work, which I think is good. Agis went through a period of separation anxiety, it seems better now (though I've also been working from home for over a year - try to leave him alone at least a bit every day) - so I do think you can have a Rott and work (not at home). It's been nice being around the boys all the time, but he was okay when I wasn't (after some work).

None of what I've said may be helpful, as all my dogs have been rescues, and Neb isn't a PB Lab and Agis isn't a PB Rott. But hopefully it gives a bit of a comparison.
Thank you , i did find it very useful and ive not been put off the breed all the advice i get gives me a clearer picture of the Rottie and helps me be more prepared
 

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Discussion Starter · #25 ·
Hi all

Ok so after a lot of thinking and reading more i have decided to go with the Rottweiler. I will be searching for a good breeder who breeds for good health and temperment.

This thread though has got be intrigued and i have a question on the difference with stronger breeds like dobermans and Rottweilers and what are considered easier breeds like labradors.

From a behavior and training point of view i am interested in why dogs like Rotties and dobes are always described as challenging and considered "stronger" breeds , how are Rottweilers more challenging than a labrador?

I just find dog behavior so fascinating and i know Rotties, Dobes,GSD, mastiffs ect need more socialization and need more training to control a more powerful dog but you always hear people say they will dominate there owner or are more challenging to own than a lab.

Im interested in knowing fully what it really means when people say these breeds are challenging or "stronger minded than labs" ect.
 

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I always think of the Retrievers as 'people pleasers'...always happy, and always wagging their tails. Easy to train, easy to have in most homes. What I noticed, taking different obedience classes with many of my Rottweilers...that the Labs and Goldens in class... would do the exercises over and over. They do not seem to mind repetition. Same with throwing a ball...many of the retrievers will chase, and retrieve a ball till they drop. Rottweilers....you do the same exercise 2-3 times, and they've got it. No need to keep doing it..or they get bored. I always started working on some other exercise in class once I could see my dog getting distracted and bored. Same with the ball throwing....

Labs are bred to work with their people...retrieving game. Rottweilers are bred to work more independently....protecting a home, herding sheep, pulling a cart,etc. They need to think for themselves, and think critically. That's why sometimes they can be challenging....they don't always want to do what you want them to do. :)

They are a great breed if you put the work with training and time into them. You need to be a firm but fair leader. If you don't want the dog on your furniture...teach the dog he can't. Be consistent. One thing I would say that is important with Rottweilers, and any breed of dog is doggie manners. Do a google search for 'NILIF' and start with this right from the beginning. It's a way to teach your dog that you are in charge without any harsh discipline or confrontation. I would also start looking for a positive based training class or dog club.
 

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Discussion Starter · #27 ·
Im definitely a firm leader ( didnt need to be with any of my labs) but my family have always said im the boss of the family so i can definitely be a leader.

That makes a lot of sense And i umderstand better now the differences between the 2.

So rotties are always classed as challenging not only because there strong powerful dogs who need more training and socialization but also are independent thinkers who dont always want to do what you want.
 

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Horse people usually do well with Rottweilers. If you can control and work with a 1,200 lb horse, a Rottweiler is a piece of cake...:) I have never thought of them as challenging....only too smart sometimes...and wanting to run the show.
People that spoil them, and never give them boundaries or rules ....soon find out the dog is running the show. I volunteered for Rottweiler Rescue for many years. For awhile I picked up the messages on our 'hot line'. People wanting to get rid of their dog NOW!! I would return their call...and usually the calls followed a pattern. Male, intact....and starting to bite and growl at the owner, or other family members...usually around 14- 24 months of age. Dog has had no formal obedience training...or just a 6 week (once a week) puppy Kindergarten class. Dog has way too much freedom, dog has very little exercise, and no consistent training. One week allowed on the sofa and sleeping in the bed...next week the owner does not want it in their bed. Dog starts growling when owner tries to haul it off their bed.:( Then dog is thrown outside in the backyard...where dog makes it's own fun...by barking and lunging at everyone that goes by, digging holes, or chewing the siding off of the house, or eating the garden hose, etc. Then owner decides the dog must GO...NOW!!! I fostered some of these punk dogs....it took about 3-4 weeks for them to start following the rules that I had for them...and of course after their neuter.

With Labs and Goldens.... a first time dog owner can get away making mistakes....with a Rottweiler you can't. It's important to get a well bred Rottweiler with a breeder that will be there for you with any questions or concerns you have. Not all Rottweilers are the same...even from the same litter. There will be an easy going pup, and a spicy tough pup...and some in the middle.
 

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Discussion Starter · #29 ·
I'll be going for the easy going pup.

Its so sad how many dont do the training or socialization and dont give there dog what it needs and so end up giving it up its not fair to the dog and with a Rottie just adds to the already unfair reputation they have.

You wouldn't believe the amount of idiots that own labs as well , allowing there dogs to jump all over other people and pester other dogs.

I always taught my labs to have good manners and be good doggy citizens.

I trained all mine from day 1 as well
 

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We have had ten Rottweilers over the years. We have had ones that didn't require as much mental stimulation and were quite calm and patient with us when we were working too hard and didn't have as much time to spend with them as we liked (but took them to work with us, so they saw us anyway 24-7). Now we have two. One fits Dj86's description. He's a hoot when he picks up something in his mouth and holds it in front of you, like "look what I have." But it's not so fun when he tears up the bills before they are paid and you have to sort the bits of paper out to figure out what you owe who. That's the boy who stays in my husband's office most of the time. The girl is obnoxious and funny when she thinks she is guarding or she's herding the boy around. "Dad says do this!!!" or "Here, let me show you the door" as she's standing behind an employee growling who has no idea she's herding them. (Initially they didn't know, now they know and it's funny to them.) But she is more laid back and I get her in my office most days and she sleeps a lot and just hangs out, happy to be there, not too needy. However, we have them with us 24-7 too, so I think that scenario would be different if we weren't. We did adopt one Rottie years ago that was in the pound because she made a lot of noise, dug and was totally obnoxious to her owners because she got no attention in her backyard. For many Rotties, even negative attention is better than no attention at all. I really don't think a Rottie is the dog for you if you can't spend a lot of time with them.
I totally agree. My first Rottie was purchased after I retired. Spent all my time with her. Socialized her from the start.
Now after her demise, I have 2 Rotties. Training everyday is fun for all of us. When you spent all your time with them, they are as laid back as can be. Every child is not a threat but a treat. Their gentleness and comraderie with the kids is so fun to watch. My dogs wouldn't bite. It's not in their DNA. Mind you, my 3 kids come home daily and smother them with kisses. I shutter sometimes. My son tortures Hank ( 120 lb) by picking him up. He hates it but puts up with it, without even a growl. My 5 month rottie must contend with the threat of a million kisses daily. She soaks it up. Love and exercise with a lot of attention, if you can give that, you can have a Rottie.
 

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Hi , new here

I have always had Labradors ive owned 4 over 20yrs and i still adore the breed but my last labrador Hugo was my soul dog he was everything to me and i lost him last year and am only just ready to start planning for my next dog but i can bring myself to have another lab and so am considering a Rottweiler but before i commit to the breed or even meet the breed i want to be certain i am right for a Rottweiler as i tend to listen to my heart more than my head and I'll fall in love with the breed even if there not for me so before i go ahead and meet them i wanted to get advice first.

I live alone and i do work full time 9-5pm , all my labs were happy with this , i would walk them in the moring ( i didn't have 4 at once i had my first and second as solo dogs third and fourth were together) before work them all were happy to be on there own for 4hrs when a dog walker came in and took them out for over an hour and then there on there own for a further 3hrs until im home and they had an evening walk as well.

I am lucky that im off 3 months in the year and always got a pup around that time and spent all 3 months working harding on bonding and training and socialization and then once i went back to work when the pup is 5 months i had a mix of help through my dog walker friend who would dog sit and a good doggy daycare until pup was old enough and well socialized enough to be walked for more than 1hr and then i dropped the doggy daycare and the dog walker took over.

All my labs were fine with this and all were happy but my labs ( for any american friends here my are showline or what you call english type) were showlines and i always picked the chilled out pup and its always worked but labs i feel are more laid back that Rottweilers when it comes to needing a "job". My labs all got plenty of mental stimulation but my impression is from books that Rottweilers need more and are not as easy going as labs.

I wanted to ask your opinion on if Rottweilers do need more than a lab?

I worry i may not be able to give a Rottweiler what he would need if they do need more than a labrador ect.
“Live alone and do work 9-5” means the Rottweiler isn’t for you
 

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Get your next Lab and expect to get the same love you have always had from your labs. Hugo will always be with you in your heart and soul. Getting another lab is just extending your happiness. Go with it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #33 ·
“Live alone and do work 9-5” means the Rottweiler isn’t for you
Ive already chosen the Rottie as a few here and on facebook have said I'll be fine.

Get your next Lab and expect to get the same love you have always had from your labs. Hugo will always be with you in your heart and soul. Getting another lab is just extending your happiness. Go with it.
Im getting a Rottie next not a lab
 

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i’ll tell you that i think labs are way more challenging than Rottweilers. every lab i’ve been around has been a hard headed nightmare. i’ve seen some very aggressive labs as well.

my experience with rotts is easier to train, with a much more suitable energy level. if you’re willing to put the time in, you should do fine and you’ll probably change your screen name.
 
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