Rottweilers Online Forums banner

1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I am simply dreading this! My friend Kerry (who actually found her as a stray before she went to the pound for her 7 days when Kerry rescued her again) is coming with us.
Roxy has never bitten anyone but has warned as all at some point. I am dreading her taking the vets arm off or something awful. I dunno if they will automatically muzzle her as I do not have a Rotti shaped muzzle as Beau is too small and his face hasn't broadened out yet.....plus I doubt we'd ever need one for him.

Roxy is a relative unknown. If she snaps in the vets tomorrow, my Husband will say we cannot have her at home. I want a house dog not a yard dog.

It's only the parvo vacc and routine de flea and de wormer she is having but she will need 3 vaccs 2 weeks apart as apparently black & tan breeds are at higher risk from Parvo according to our vet.... who is excellent. I looked online and found some truth in it BUT no one I speak to in the UK has heard of it before.

I'm so dreading her kicking up a fuss tho..... I'm ensuring Hubby brings Beau sling so he will be in the waiting room rather than treatment room (crafty thinking on my part) ;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,390 Posts
If you're not sure, then YOU should muzzle the dog for the safety of everyone. I work for a vet and the ONE THING I cannot stand is folks who know the dog may react and say or do nothing until AFTER the dog has growled or tried to bite. It is part of my job to get bitten if necessary - rather me instead of the doctor - so if your dog is a "relative unknown" to YOU, then muzzle her.

No shame in it at all - three of my four have to be muzzled when examined. Also, tire her out prior to the visit - get rid of some of the nervous energy.

Speaking of nervous - if YOU are nervous, she'll be nervous - so maybe if you were not in the room she'd be better. but definitely muzzle her for everyone's safety.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
380 Posts
My vet used dried liver to "soften her up" before he did anything to her. It worked really well. When she went to hospital and they actually hurt her, I noticed her body language change, before she gave her "warning" rumble. I asked them to muzzle her. She has never ever bitten who snapped in anger, but if in doubt it's better to muzzle. It's only for a short time, and from her perspective, it's an unknown and she may feel uneasy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
880 Posts
The vet will have muzzles, and by all means please tell them you don't know her history, and to go accordingly. I was always a nervous wreck Nino would bite (couldnt help it), and my nerves made him fearful. When he hurt his knee back in the summer, I asked the vet to muzzle him because he was in obvious pain, and to take him away from me for the exam. Last week when he went for xrays for an elbow spine issue, the vet and I talked about that very thing. Nino is much better and wags his stump while he calmly allows the vet to put the muzzle on and tolerates any exam very well. Removing me from the equation was better for everyone concerned.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,832 Posts
I agree with everyone. I insisted we had a muzzle in the room when I took Moose to the Vet. His body language made me feel uncomfortable. They didn't use it but I would have put it on him in a heartbeat if I felt he couldn't be trusted. I held him and stayed between him and the Vet as much as possible and it worked. The next time I want him muzzled right away. I don't want him to hurt anyone. He probably wouldn't but the size of his teeth could cause a lot of damage if he reacted.
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top