Rottweilers Online Forums banner

1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
50 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My baby has been diagnosed again with this horrible disease. In June 2019 she had mandible sarcoma. They removed her lower jaw bone and we did 6 rounds of chemo.
Here we are, 22 months out, beat the odds, she had 1/4 xrays done and doing great! Easter Sunday weekend, we had two trips to the vet because of her having diarrhea. Xena is almost 9.6 y/o now and every now and again she has a limp because of her high energy antics and dive bombing on to her bed when she's playful. She developed a limp again and i crate rest her... The limp didn't get better and we visited the vet. Xrays, etc. revealed that her cancer returned in her right leg. I'm am so devastated. (If some of you recall, I had Porsha who lived to 10.5 years and a mass on her brain took her from me... I was crushed when i had to say good-bye to her and I will always hold onto the belief that she sent me Xena who has my heart).

I have read that this is often misdiagnosed. We are taking her to a specialty hospital tonight to be seen by an orthopedic specialist where they will review her xrays. Xena is holding up her affected paw and she is limping. She is eating, drinking, etc.

Has anyone ever had an experience where it ddn't turn out to be "C"...

I can't bear the thought of losing this girl, we just lost Mercedes about a year ago.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
354 Posts
I'm so sorry. Let us know how tonight goes. I hope it's not the 'c'. Sending good thoughts to you and Xena.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
1,366 Posts
I'm so sorry to hear this. :( Sadly , we have been through this with our own dogs, and with some of the fosters that I adopted out. Bone cancer is VERY painful. Often the vet will advise to take the leg off, because the bone looks like swiss cheese and is likely to break easily. The leg amputation often just buys a bit of time...and most of the time the cancer has spread though the cells are still microscopic. I have never put a dog through an amputation...and painful recovery, only to have to put them down a month or two later. I think quality of life is more important, than quantity. Often we want to keep them alive because we can't let go. This is a time to think with your head, and not your heart. Do what is best for Xena...even if it's hard. Love her, spoil her and enjoy the time you have with her.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Camy

·
Registered
Joined
·
50 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Any update on Xena? We are thinking of you.
We were at the specialist on Tuesday and they confirmed that Xena has Osteosarcoma. Update on Xena... she is acting normal, eating, drinking and her lameness is better than it was before. We are not doing anything i.e., amputation, chemo, etc. but we are looking into alternative treatments... herbs, infusions, etc. I have always done everything I can until they tell me it's their time... But this one is going to be by far, the most difficult for me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
494 Posts
Sorry you are having to go through this again. Poor girl. They don't deserve this.

I lost 3 Rottwielers to cancer. 3 different types of cancer: Rocky had lung cancer, Ringo had bone cancer in his shoulder and Johnny had lymphoma.

I have my girl Bella on an anti-cancer diet. She is over 10 and so far so good. No big C diagnosis. Here are a couple of links to websites I discovered after losing my boys in hopes of keeping my girl around ahwile longer. I also make litte "fat bombs" with CBD. I found the most potent I could legally buy where I live.

Best wishes to you. I hope she gets better. It can happen.

KetoPet | Low carb ketogenic diet dog cancer & health

How A Ketogenic Diet Is Helping Dogs With Cancer — The Bones & Co..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
354 Posts
I'm so sorry - this must be just an awful feeling. I hope your interventions work well and she has more, and quality, time. You guys are great to do that for her.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
1,366 Posts
We were at the specialist on Tuesday and they confirmed that Xena has Osteosarcoma. Update on Xena... she is acting normal, eating, drinking and her lameness is better than it was before. We are not doing anything i.e., amputation, chemo, etc. but we are looking into alternative treatments... herbs, infusions, etc. I have always done everything I can until they tell me it's their time... But this one is going to be by far, the most difficult for me.
I'm sorry that your fears were confirmed. I hope that you can help Xena buy some more quality time with you.
Let us know she is doing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
655 Posts
I'm so sorry for your pain and Xena's pain. We had a Rottie named Xena too many years ago. She toed out in front and had an immune system problem where she was on Prednisone that suppressed her immune system. She got cancer in a front leg on the knee and we didn't amputate because with her immune deficiency problem we figured it would be a matter of time before she had cancer in the other knee that was not straight and would be under even more duress from being the only front leg, so we decided to let her have as long of a time as she could before putting her to sleep.

The only thing I regret is not having a vet do the deed at home. It is much easier on the dog and on you if you can PTS in familiar and loving surroundings. I have always been there for the dog as they are being put to sleep too, to let them know how much I love them. Animal communicators can be contacted by telephone for a last goodby as well, and that eases your mind more than the dog's. The dogs generally understand what is happening and usually are at peace with it more so than we are. I recommend several animal communicators: Bea Lydecker (you can find her on the internet, she sells vitamins too; Joy Mason (also has an internet site) and Lydia Hiby. You can see them in action in videos on YouTube too. Here is Lydia Hibby in a video talking to my horse:
She actually told me things I didn't know that were validated by his previous owner. I know some people understand and feel this is possible and some don't. I respect either viewpoint, but have had a tremendous amount of experience having animal communicators talk to adopted dogs and my horses through the years and every time we adopted a dog their behaviors coincided perfectly with their backgrounds as they related them to the animal communicator. Also worth mentioning, I had an animal communicator talk to my last horse before we put him to sleep (arthritis had interfered with his spinal column) and that goodbye with him through the animal communicator made it easier for me to bear the pain of the situation. I had him for 23 of his 26 years and loved him very much.

I'm very sorry you have to go through this heartache. We have had many Rotties die of cancer over the years. I now feed them a partial Buddig diet. In their evening meal, I give them a half cup of organic low-fat cottage cheese and a tablespoon of organic flax oil with their kibble. It has helped cancer-ridden dogs live a bit longer and I believe it has helped our remaining dogs live longer. The last Rottie girl we had lived 14 years... the longest we have ever had a Rottie go, and she had that Buddig supplement for most of the time we owned her and we adopted her when she was around 2 y.o. You can look up Buddig diet on the internet, it was a diet made in the 50s to increase immune system function for humans. However, I have adapted it for our dogs. So many of our dogs have died of cancer it sickens me to think of it... and I do what I can to try to prevent it as long as possible.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
50 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Another update.... Xena is still with us, she's enjoying her food, getting outside to enjoy the fresh air. She is confined to the family room which is carpeted and we always have her on a leash when taken outside. We have consulted with an orthopedic and radiologist. We just came back from an alternative oncologist.... My husband sort of put the pressure on her to be honest with us. There's nothing we can do.... Nothing will buy us time. We can pump her full of drugs (we do give her pain meds) but it's keeping her alive for us (mostly me). I am so devastated over this and what lies ahead... All I do is cry and I can't even imagine what it's going to be like without her. So I need to come to terms with this and we need to figure out when I say goodbye to my heart dog, Xena.
18927
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
1,366 Posts
She's beautiful!! I'm so sorry that you are going to have to make the decision.:( I know how hard it is to make the choice...if you should let them go a bit earlier so they don't break their leg and have to be put to sleep in a panic situation. When my China was diagnosed her leg swelled up (bloodwork was perfect)...and we had her on pain pills.We did the same, kept her leashed and not allowed to jump around or any quick moves. There came a day she did not want to eat....this dog had lived to eat. She would not even eat her favorite treat (Timbit's) doughnut holes if you are not Canadian. That was the day I called the vet to euthanize her. I hope she has a few good days left. Please don't cry...save the tears for after she is gone. Just love her and spoil her now.💔
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
354 Posts
What a beautiful girl. Thank you for sharing her picture.

I'm so sorry...cancer is so awful, and when there is no good option - sometimes euthanasia is the best. Cherish her for as long as you've got, how much you love her is clear.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
1,366 Posts
Was wondering how Xena was ?? Did you say 'goodbye' to her?? 💔
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top